Angerton - South Lakeland - Cumbria

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Introduction


Geography

Angerton is in the coastal plain adjacent to Duddon Estuary. It is in Countryside Character Area 7 - West Cumbrian Coastal Plain. Glacial deposits overlie Silurian shales and slate, producing marshland next to the sea. The 1850 map gives the area of the township as 2195 acres and 24 perches, of which 1120 acres, 2 roods and 18 perches was tidal water. Since then the position of the channels and the boundary in the estuary have changed. The Comprehensive Gazetteer of England and Wales, 1894-5 states that: The greater part of the land is moor and waste, the remainder arable and pasture. The population in 1861, 1871, 1881 and 1891 was 31, 36, 32 and 28 respectively.

The Furness Railway (Barrow to Whitehaven), which was constructed in 1848, crosses the civil parish.

For a map showing the civil parish boundary, see: LinkExternal link

History

The name Angerton was first recorded as Angertona in the Coucher Book of Furness Abbey in 1293 (Ekwall 1960), and from the name it could have been a Saxon settlement. The present farm called Angerton is outside of the former civil parish. This is because the latter was formed in 1866 to give administrative status to the extra-parochial area of Angerton Moss. Being extra-parochial meant that it was not in a parish, and therefore there were no tithes to pay, a privilege often granted to monastic houses. It would therefore seem likely that the land belonged to Furness Abbey before the Dissolution. It was not unusual for marshland to be given to religious houses, and the monks were skilled at draining the land and using it for pasture. The population throughout the late 19C was around 30, and there have been no new houses built since, so it is surprising that the civil parish has survived. From 1976 it became part of Duddon Parish Council, along with Broughton West and Dunnerdale with Seathwaite civil parishes, however it still retains its identity and boundaries. Before 1974 it was in Lancashire.

The following were farmers in Angerton in 1882 (Mannex): Isaac Keen of Marsh Houses, Thomas Pritt of Angerton Hall, Samuel Whineray of Waitham Hill, Sarah Whineray of Marshfield. Also, in Broughton West CP, Isabella Singleton of Angerton Farm.

Sources


Exploration


SD2083


1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright


The part within Angerton is just sand, with two theoretical bridleways crossing it. These are rights of way, but not of course tracks, as any track would disappear during the next high tide. One has the impression that they have been sketched onto the map in artistic curves, and the one running north-south from Foxfield to Dunnerholme makes no attempt at avoiding river channels, although these have doubtless changed their course over the years. The current OS map carries a warning: "Public Rights of Way across Duddon Sands can be dangerous. Seek local guidance". There are no images for this square in Geograph yet.

SD2182


1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright


This square contains the edge of the salt marsh and a large area of sand, across which are 'invisible' bridleways, two across the estuary to The Hill and Strands in Millom Without civil parish and one looping around the coast to Angerton Point. The current OS map carries a warning: "Public Rights of Way across Duddon Sands can be dangerous. Seek local guidance". There are no images for this square in Geograph yet.

SD2183


1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright


More sand, and a rocky outcrop of Silurian shale called Whelpshead Crag (SD213836), which would make an excellent 'first geograph'. On the 1786 map it is shown as an island, but on the 1850 map the marsh and coastline extended further out than it does today. Inland there are fields claimed from the marsh in the 19C, and Herd House Moss.

Herd House Moss is a registered common, but there does not seem to be any public route to reach it. Herd House was at SD218836 and it apparently had two fields on the south-western side of the moss, which are shown as rough grassland on the 1:25000 map. Mannex's Directory of 1882 did not include an occupant for the house, so considering its name perhaps it was seasonally occupied by a herdsman.

SD2184


1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright


At SD213847 a lane leads through Angerton, nestling between outcrops of Silurian shale, to the shore. In 1850 there was a slate depot on Angerton Point at SD212841. The route then continues as a bridleway curving around the coastline over the sands to Sand Side, Kirkby in Furness. Angerton Point and the farm called Angerton are in Broughton in Furness civil parish (see explanation under 'History').

SD2184 : Railway by Alexander P Kapp
This is the Furness Railway, as seen from the level crossing on the lane from Foxfield. The Angerton boundary is 500m away along the line.



SD2184 : Gate by Alexander P Kapp
Following the lane eastwards from the level crossing, the entrance to the Duddon Nature Reserve is at a bend. We are not yet in Angerton civil parish, which is reached when the lane crosses the Raby Cut, a drainage ditch.



SD2282


1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright


The part of Angerton in this square is all salt marsh. There is a bridleway across the marsh on the map, but no sign of a track in the aerial view.

SD2283


1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright


SD2282 : Railway bridge over Sand Side marsh by Raymond Knapman
The Furness Railway crosses into Angerton on a bridge, captioned 'Wooden Br.' on the 1850 map, over Kirkby Pool. There is also public footpath that crosses the tidal river by a ford (1891 map) or perhaps by the pipe-bridge alongside the railway bridge?. The footpath crosses the railway, and the two white ladder stiles can be seen in the photograph.



The path continues to Angerton Hall. This name occurs in Mannex's directory of 1882, yet on the 1891 map and the 1927 1 map it is Moss Farm. On the 1850 map it is called Moss Barns.

SD2283 : Level crossing at Angerton Hall by Alexander P Kapp
The railway was constructed between the farm and the lane, so access is by a level crossing.



SD2283 : Marsh Field by Alexander P Kapp
Along the lane from Angerton Hall to Waitham; the driveway is to Marsh Field Farm.



East of Marsh Field the shape of the parish boundary shows that there was a river meander, within which the 1850 map shows a marsh.

SD2284


1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright


Entering the square on the lane from the south, there is a right turn to Moss Houses (farm), from which a track goes to Moss Houses Bridge and crosses over the Kirkby Pool into Kirkby Ireleth civil parish, where it becomes a bridleway.

At SD228842 there is an abrupt bend in the road, round the corner of a block of curiously diamond-shaped fields. The fields along the western side of Kirkby Pool (tidal stream) are irregularly shaped, suggesting that they are much older than the regularly shaped fields to the west, which were probably not enclosed until the 18C.

SD2284 : Cumbria Coastal Way by Alexander P Kapp
Waitham Coppice was called The Plantation in 1850 and Fir Coppice in 1891.



On the western side of the square, the lane is unfenced across Waitham Common. On the rocky knoll there were gravel pits (1850) or quarries (1891) on each side of the lane, and on the sheltered east side of the hill is a house called Waitham Hill. The water supply was from a well (1850) and later a pump (1891), where there is now a small building. Just after the climb over a rocky knoll there was a path to the south to Little Waitham. This name is still on the map, although there is no longer a house there. A footpath leads from Waitham Hill to the A595 via Cow Bridge (see SD2285).

SD2285


1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright


A footpath from Waitham Hill, skirting the eastern side of Bank End Moss, crosses Cow Bridge on its way to the A595. At the bridge the 1850 map notes that 'Ordinary Tides flow to this point'.

Last edited 18Aug10
KML
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