Beam Engines in the UK

( Page 1 2 3 4 5 )
Creative Commons Licence [Some Rights Reserved]   Text © Copyright October 2011, Chris Allen; licensed for re-use under a Creative Commons Licence.
Images also under a similar Creative Commons Licence.


Contents

Newcomen Memorial Engine, Dartmouth, Devon

An atmospheric beam pumping engine by an unknown maker at an unknown date. It was installed secondhand in 1821 at Hawkesbury Junction to supply water to the Coventry Canal. The open topped cylinder is 22" x 4' and it has a 'pickle-pot' condenser below and a more modern type of rack and sector valve gear for steam and injection valves. The beam is wooden with arch-heads and chains to the piston and pump - only possible with a single acting design. It worked until 1913 and was then disused. It was moved to Dartmouth in 1963 to celebrate the tercentenary of its inventor's birth in Dartmouth. It can be demonstrated by a hydraulic power pack.
SX8751 : Newcomen Engine House, Dartmouth by Chris Allen SX8751 : Newcomen Engine House, Dartmouth SX8751 : Dartmouth Newcomen engine by Chris Allen SX8751 : Dartmouth Newcomen engine

Nottingham Industrial Museum, Wollaton Park, Nottingham

This museum houses a waterworks Woolf compound rotative engine from Basford Waterworks. This is housed in a glass-sided, purpose-built engine house and is steamed regularly It was built in 1858 by R & W Hawthorn of Newcastle upon Tyne. The cylinders are 18'5" x 54" and 31.75" x 72". The flywheel is 18' diameter and the beam 23' long.
SK5339 : Nottingham Industrial Museum - beam engine by Chris Allen SK5339 : Nottingham Industrial Museum - beam engine SK5339 : Basford Beam Engine - Wollaton Hall by Ashley Dace SK5339 : Basford Beam Engine - Wollaton Hall
SK5339 : Basford Beam Engine - Wollaton Hall by Ashley Dace SK5339 : Basford Beam Engine - Wollaton Hall SK5339 : Nottingham Industrial Museum - beam engine detail by Chris AllenSK5339 : Nottingham Industrial Museum - beam engine detail
SK5339 : Nottingham Industrial Museum - beam engine by Chris Allen SK5339 : Nottingham Industrial Museum - beam engine

Poldark Mine & Heritage centre, Wendron, near Helston, Cornwall

This is home to a reconstructed Cornish non-rotative beam pumping engine. This came from Greensplat china clay pit and has been re-erected in the open so that it can be appreciated in its entirety at a glance - a unique experience. The builder is unknown and it is thought to have been built in about 1855. It was the last engine of its type to work in Cornwall and stopped in Christmas week 1958. It is a small engine of its type with a 30" cylinder and strokes of 9' in the cylinder and 8' in the shaft. The engine can be moved by hydraulic power.
SW6831 : Poldark Mine by Chris Allen SW6831 : Poldark Mine

The Steam Museum, Preston, Canterbury, Kent

The museum has, to the best of my knowledge, two beam engines on public display. The largest is a single column Woolf compound from Henwood Pumping Station, Ashford and was built by Thomas Horn of Westminster in 1870. It is very similar to the one on display at Bredgar & Wormshill Light Railway. It is demonstrated in steam on two or three occasions per year.
TR0142 : Henwood Pumping Station, beam engine by Chris Allen TR0142 : Henwood Pumping Station, beam engine TR2460 : Beam Engine, Preston Court Farm by Chris Allen TR2460 : Beam Engine, Preston Court Farm

The other engine is a portable six column beam engine by Colbourne Cambridge of Market Lavington and built in 1837. The cylinder is 4" x 7" and it must be one of the smallest 'full-size beam engines anywhere.
No photograph

When visited some years ago there was a dismantled grasshopper engine, apparently for sale, from a slipway on the Isle of Wight. This is not in the current catalogue on the web-site.
SZ4994 : Shambler's Wharf, beam engine. by Chris Allen SZ4994 : Shambler's Wharf, beam engine.

Also in store and for quick disposal (as of October 2011) was a large Woolf compound Simpson beam pump from Otterbourne Pumping station and previously stored at Sherborne for many years
ST6416 : The former Sherborne Gas Works by Chris Allen ST6416 : The former Sherborne Gas Works. This engine was subsequently sold to a private collector in Wiltshire and in 2014 was awaiting its turn for restoration and re-erection.

Science Museum, South Kensington, London

This museum probably has the most significant collection of beam engines in the country including a Newcomen type pump, several engines by Boulton and Watt and an early A-frame Woolf compound engine.

The Newcomen type atmospheric engine was built by Francis Thompson in 1791 for Oakerthorpe Colliery near Derby and re-erected at Pentrich Colliery in 1841. The cylinder is 51.25" bore and the stroke was 7'. It could raise 220 gallons per minute through 360' at 8 strokes per minute - equivalent to 25 horsepower. The iron beam is a later replacement of the wooden original. This is the biggest preserved Newcomen type engine in the country.
TQ2679 : Science Museum - Pentrich atmospheric engine by Chris Allen TQ2679 : Science Museum - Pentrich atmospheric engine TQ2679 : The Science Museum - Francis Thompson's engine by Chris Allen TQ2679 : The Science Museum - Francis Thompson's engine

Old Bess - the remains of the oldest Boulton & Watt beam engine in existence. Built in 1777 and used at the Soho Manufactory to pump water that was recirculated over the water wheel driving the works. The single acting cylinder is 33" x 84" stroke and the pump is 24" bore. Only these large parts remain and the engine was donated in 1861. When it was dismantled a separate furnace was found below the cylinder to help reduce condensation and improve efficiency - a practice that was soon discontinued. This was the second engine built at Soho (although for customers only the lighter metal parts were built in house - the casting was done by select foundries and the wooden parts were sourced by the erectors).
TQ2679 : The Science Museum - 'Old Bess' by Chris Allen TQ2679 : The Science Museum - 'Old Bess'

The 'Lap engine' is arguably the most important of all the engines on display and has spawned several replicas world-wide. It is a Boulton and Watt rotative beam engine dating from 1788 and used at Boulton's Soho Manufactory to drive polishing (lap) machines. It worked until 1858 and was presented for preservation in 1861. It incorporates all of Watt's improvements - the separate condenser, rotative motion using a sun and planet gear, parallel motion and the flyball governor (borrowed from wind and water mill technology). The double acting cylinder is 18.75" x 48" and the flywheel is 15.76' pitch circle diameter.
The engine is of 10 nominal horsepower but indicated 13.75 horsepower.
TQ2679 : Science Museum - the 'lap engine' by Chris Allen TQ2679 : Science Museum - the 'lap engine'

The Atkinson engine - Boulton & Watt rotative beam engine built in 1797 and erected for John Maude, manufacturing chemist in London and later transferred to Atkinson's chemical works where it ran until 1886. The original cylinder was 16" x 48" but in 1806 it was replaced by the current 19.25" bore cylinder. This engine has the added sophistication of a separate cut-off valve in the steam supply operated by a cam and roller on the countershaft driving the valve gear. The structure, including the beam is largely wood. Cast iron beams came in from 1800 onwards.
TQ2679 : Science Museum - The Atkinson Engine by Chris Allen TQ2679 : Science Museum - The Atkinson Engine

In addition to the early Newcomen type engine and the Boulton & Watt beam engines, the science museum illustrates the later development of the beam engine with this pretty independent A-frame Woolf compound type of engine built 1838-40 (according to Watkins, 1838 according to Crowley). The slide valve cylinders are 8" x 20.5" and 14.875" x 30". It developed 25 horsepower at 47 rpm. It was installed second-hand in 1880 at the engineering work of Davies & Bailey at Hemel Hempstead where it worked for over 70 years before being preserved at its maker's works in Dartford. It subsequently was donated to the Science Museum.
It is a compact, self-contained design well-suited for smaller powers. The tank bed contains the condensing plant but is not well-appreciated in this view.
TQ2679 : The Science Museum - J & E Hall beam engine by Chris Allen TQ2679 : The Science Museum - J & E Hall beam engine

Six column, independent beam engine. A typical small self contained beam engine thought to be c1830-40 and used until 1905 to drive a set of drying rolls. Donated in 1915. It was once on loan to the National Portrait Gallery but has now appeared in a gallery on the making of the modern world. The cylinder is 7.25" x 14". The parallel motion is of an unusual design and the framing has cross-bracing.
TQ2679 : The Science Museum - six column, independent beam engine by Chris Allen TQ2679 : The Science Museum - six column, independent beam engine

The Museum also has the side lever marine engine from the paddle steamer Comet on display but I haven't got an acceptable image of that. Several other important engines are in store at Wroughton and at least one exhibit (the c1810 all metal rotative beam engine known as the Salt Union Engine) is believed to no longer exist.

In 1989 there was a single cylinder grasshopper beam engine on display built in 1861 by Easton & Amos for the Royal Horticultural Society, Wisley, then used at the Royal Albert Hall. It is no longer on display and although there is a similar engine in Australasia I have not definitely linked the two.
TQ2679 : The Science Museum - grasshopper beam engine by Chris Allen TQ2679 : The Science Museum - grasshopper beam engine

Scottish Mining Museum, Lady Victoria Colliery, Newtongrange, Midlothian

This site is now home to a small single cylinder A-frame beam engine that was on display in the open at Heriot Watt University for many years. It is claimed to have been built as far back as 1790 but has had many new parts and repairs in the intervening years. the cylinder is 18" x 42" and the piston is guided by guide bars rather than parallel motion. It was latterly at Highhouse Colliery from 1890 as a haulage engine and was retired in 1956.
NT3363 : Lady Victoria Colliery by Alan Murray-Rust NT3363 : Lady Victoria Colliery NT2573 : Steam engine "Old Ben" by Chris Allen NT2573 : Steam engine "Old Ben"

Snibston Discovery Park, Coalville, Leicestershire

This museum based on a colliery site includes one beam engine that is the twin of the engine on display at Forncett Industrial Steam Museum and came from Hopwas Pumping Station near Tamworth. This is a single cylinder beam pumping engine built by Gimson & Co of Leicester in 1880. The cylinder is 25" x 5' stroke with a Meyer expansion slide valve. The engine was of 50 horsepower. It stopped in 1964 and was removed in 1987.
SK1704 : Former Tamworth Water Works, Hopwas by Chris Allen SK1704 : Former Tamworth Water Works, Hopwas SK1704 : Hopwas Pumping Station by Chris Allen SK1704 : Hopwas Pumping Station
SK4114 : Snibston Beam Engine by Ashley Dace SK4114 : Snibston Beam Engine SK4114 : Beam engine - Snibston by Chris Allen SK4114 : Beam engine - Snibston

Unfortunately this museum closed at the end of July 2015 and the area where the exhibition hall is was sold off. The beam engine has now gone into store.

The Museum of Somerset, Taunton, Castle, Taunton, Somerset

This museum reopened in September 2011 following an expensive refurbishment but is still home to a Woolf compound beam engine from Pearsall's Silk Mill. This is thought to date from 1850 and is by Easton & Amos of London.
ST2224 : Taunton Castle Museum, steam engine by Chris Allen ST2224 : Taunton Castle Museum, steam engine ST2224 : Beam engine, Taunton Castle Museum by Chris Allen ST2224 : Beam engine, Taunton Castle Museum ST2224 : Somerset County museum - beam engine by Chris Allen ST2224 : Somerset County museum - beam engine

The Steam Museum, Lodge Park, Straffan, Co Kildare, Eire

Not within the UK but listed by Geoff, this is home to two beam engines for which there are currently no Geograph images. See - LinkExternal link
No photographs

Strumpshaw Steam Museum & Farm Machinery Collection, Strumpshaw, near Norwich, Norfolk

This museum covers road steam, a large organ, stationary steam and internal combustion engines. The beam engine is one of two from Addington Pumping Station in Croydon. This was built in 1893 by Glenfield & Co of Kilmarnock and is an A-frame, Woolf compound rotative beam pumping engine. It developed 125 horsepower at 14-16 rpm on steam at 100 psi from a range of hand-fired Cornish boilers.
TG3406 : Strumpshaw Hall Steam Museum by Chris Allen TG3406 : Strumpshaw Hall Steam Museum

Summerlee Heritage Park, Coatbridge, Lanarkshire

This museum is home to a unique, in the UK, rotative Newcomen-type atmospheric winding engine. Erected in 1810 by John Mackay at Farme colliery near Rutherglen to wind from a 60 fathom (360') shaft. The cylinder is 31.75" bore by 66" stroke. It was hand operated at all times and ran at up to 27 rpm. It remained in use for 105 years and was in store for very many years before its major reconstruction at Summerlee.
NS7365 : Summerlee, Farme Colliery Newcomen engine by Chris Allen NS7365 : Summerlee, Farme Colliery Newcomen engine NS7265 : Farme Colliery engine, Summerlee by Chris Allen NS7265 : Farme Colliery engine, Summerlee

Thinktank - The Birmingham Museum of Science & Discovery, Birmingham

This museum is home to four significant beam engines as well as several other important examples of stationary steam engine technology.

Most important is the Smethwick engine (once known as the Ocker Hill engine). This was built in 1779 by Boulton & Watt as a canal pump and is now the world's oldest steamable engine, although it is more usually moved by hydraulic power in deference to its age and frailty. The cylinder is 32" by 96" and it is single acting with chains acting over arch-heads at each end of the trussed wooden beam. It has survived in parts of four centuries and Thinktank is the fourth home it has worked in.
SP0787 : Thinktank - the Smethwick engine by Chris Allen SP0787 : Thinktank - the Smethwick engine

Dating from about 1830 is a self-contained six column beam engine that could have been moved from one site to another as the semi-portable engine of its day. The cylinder is 6" x 24", the beam 70" between centres and the flywheel 80" diameter. This is turned by an electric motor.
SP0787 : Semi Portable Beam Engine by Ashley Dace SP0787 : Semi Portable Beam Engine

A most unusual engine is an interconnected 'odd' pair of compounded beam engines that were used to assist a waterwheel powered rolling mill and date from the c1840s. The high pressure engine is 18" x 60" with a 15' 6" beam supported on an A-frame. The low pressure engine is connected by gearing and the cylinder is 26" x 30" with a single column supporting a 9' 10" beam. The low pressure engine ran faster to accommodate the greater volume of steam passing through a cylinder that was little different in swept volume to the high pressure one. This is turned by an electric motor.
SP0787 : Steam Rolling Mill Engines by Ashley Dace SP0787 : Steam Rolling Mill Engines SP0787 : Steam Rolling Mill Engines by Ashley Dace SP0787 : Steam Rolling Mill Engines

The final engine on display is a very elegant six column Woolf compound built in 1864 by Easton, Amos & Sons, London for the Old Kent Road Gasworks. The cylinders are 10" x 25" and 17" x 36". The beam is 9' 10" between centres and the flywheel is 14' 2" diameter. This is a regular runner under steam.
SP0787 : Six Column Woolf Compound Beam Engine by Ashley Dace SP0787 : Six Column Woolf Compound Beam Engine SP0787 : Six Column Woolf Compound Beam Engine by Ashley Dace SP0787 : Six Column Woolf Compound Beam Engine
The old Birmingham Museum of Science and Industry had two further beam engines that are now both on loan. A John Fowler single column engine is at the Anson Museum and a Robert Stephenson grasshopper beam engine of 1827 (the engine that helped build Stephenson's Rocket) is at Beamish.

The Waterworks Museum, Broomy Hill, Hereford

This museum has a single column, single cylinder rotative beam pumping engine that is on loan from the National Museum of Wales. It was built in 1851 by Harvey of Hayle, Cornwall and used at Ely Pumping Station, Cardiff where it worked for about a century. The cylinder is 20" x 36" and the flywheel is 13' diameter. It was on display and motor driven at the Welsh Industrial & Maritime Museum, Cardiff until its untimely closure.
SO4939 : The Waterworks Museum, Hereford - beam engine by Chris Hodrien SO4939 : The Waterworks Museum, Hereford - beam engine

Engines preserved in situ


Abbey Pumping Station, Leicester


This large sewage pumping station is now home to a museum of technology but retains its four indigenous Woolf compound beam pumping engines built in 1891 by Gimson & Co of Leicester. These are all in the same room with glazed bricks and ornate cast iron columns. The engines are large examples with cylinders 30" x 69.5" & 48" x 102". The flywheels are 21' diameter and the beams are of plain steel plate construction and 28' long. The engines are of 200 indicated horsepower each.
SK5806 : Beam engines, Abbey Pumping Station, Leicester by Chris Allen SK5806 : Beam engines, Abbey Pumping Station, Leicester SK5806 : Abbey Pumping Station - the packing platform by Chris Allen SK5806 : Abbey Pumping Station - the packing platform
SK5806 : Abbey Pumping Station by Chris AllenSK5806 : Abbey Pumping Station

In the former boiler house is a small tank bed A-frame beam engine from Morrell's Brewery, Oxford and thought to be of c1840s or 1850s vintage. The maker is unknown.
SK5806 : A Frame Beam Engine by Ashley DaceSK5806 : A Frame Beam Engine

Beeleigh Mill, Maldon, Essex

This corn mill retains a long disused Woolf compound A-frame beam engine built in 1845 by Wentworth & Son of Wandsworth and disused since 1875. A Trust has been formed with the intention of restoring it to steam. the site also contains a unique in the UK 'elephant boiler'.
TL8308 : Beeleigh Mill by Chris Allen TL8308 : Beeleigh Mill TL8308 : Beam engine, Beeleigh Mill by Chris Allen TL8308 : Beam engine, Beeleigh Mill
TL8308 : Beeleigh Mill, beam engine by Chris Allen TL8308 : Beeleigh Mill, beam engine TL8308 : 'Elephant boiler', Beeleigh Mill by Chris Allen TL8308 : 'Elephant boiler', Beeleigh Mill
TL8308 : Hurst frame, Beeleigh Mill by Chris Allen TL8308 : Hurst frame, Beeleigh Mill

Blagdon Pumping Station, Blagdon, North Somerset

This station retains two of the four Woolf compound rotative beam pumping engines installed in 1902 by Glenfield & Kennedy of Kilmarnock. The cylinders are 21" x 63" & 34" x 84" with double beat Cornish valves. The beams each weigh 17 tons and the flywheels 20 tons and each engine was good for 170 horsepower. The water company open the station on summer Sunday afternoons and one engine is rotated quite briskly by an electric motor.
ST5060 : Blagdon Pumping Station by Chris Allen ST5060 : Blagdon Pumping Station ST5059 : Blagdon Pumping Station - steam engine by Chris Allen ST5059 : Blagdon Pumping Station - steam engine
ST5059 : Beam Engine at Blagdon Pumping Station by Richard LawST5059 : Beam Engine at Blagdon Pumping Station

British Engineerium, Hove, East Sussex

The former Goldstone Pumping Station is now a museum. it is currently undergoing refurbishment and there are only occasional open days. Hopefully formal re-opening will be in 2012. There are two magnificent Woolf compound rotative beam pumping engines.

No. 1 was built in 1866 by Easton & Amos of London. As seen here it was incomplete, inoperable and surrounded by a variety of artefacts. The site is currently being refurbished and it is claimed this engine will be returned to an operable condition. The cylinders are 28" x 64.75" & 46" x 96" and it was good for 204 ihp on test. Normal speed was 12-16 rpm on steam at 70 psi.
TQ2806 : The Engineerium - 1866 beam engine house by Chris Allen TQ2806 : The Engineerium - 1866 beam engine house TQ2806 : Goldstone pumping Station - beam engine by Chris Allen TQ2806 : Goldstone pumping Station - beam engine

No. 2 was built in 1875 by Eastons & Anderson, London & Erith and can be demonstrated in steam. The cylinders are 28" x 64.75" & 46" x 96". The flywheel is 23' 6" diameter. The engine was good for 150 horsepower at 16 rpm and pumped 125,000 gallons of potable water per hour. This is a very fine example of its type and apart from a rattle from the Porter governor is virtually silent in operation.
TQ2806 : Goldstone Pumping Station by Chris Allen TQ2806 : Goldstone Pumping Station TQ2806 : Beam engine, Engineerium by Chris Allen TQ2806 : Beam engine, Engineerium

Claymills Pumping Station, Stretton, Burton upon Trent, Staffordshire


SK2625 : Claymills Victorian Sewage Pumping Station by Chris AllenSK2625 : Claymills Victorian Sewage Pumping Station
This is probably the best photographed beam engine site on Geograph. It was built in 1885 to pump sewage from Burton to a sewage farm in Derbyshire. There are four Woolf compound rotative beam pumping engines by Gimson & Co of Leicester. The cylinders have cam operated Cornish double beat drop valves and are 24" x 72" & 38" x 96". The beams are 13 tons in weight and 28' long. The flywheels are 24' diameter and weigh 24 tons. Each engine drove a pair of single acting plunger pumps and could pump about 3 million gallons per day.

A/B engine house contains two unrestored engines that had been allowed to become seriously deteriorated before the operating Trust was allowed access.
SK2625 : A and B by Ashley Dace SK2625 : A and B SK2625 : Engine A by Ashley Dace SK2625 : Engine A
SK2625 : Claymills Victorian Pumping Station - A engine by Chris Allen SK2625 : Claymills Victorian Pumping Station - A engine

However, by 2017 B was restored and back in steam.
SK2625 : Recently Restored B Engine at Claymills Sewage Pumping Station by David Dixon SK2625 : Recently Restored B Engine at Claymills Sewage Pumping Station SK2625 : Claymills Victorian Pumping Station - B engine by Chris Allen SK2625 : Claymills Victorian Pumping Station - B engine

C/D engine house, on the other hand, was retained in much better condition and has been further improved by the Trust. The two engines in here can be demonstrated in steam, both singly and together.
SK2625 : C/D Engine House - Claymills Victorian Pumping Station  by Chris Allen SK2625 : C/D Engine House - Claymills Victorian Pumping Station SK2625 : Claymills Victorian Pumping Station - sewage pumps by Chris Allen SK2625 : Claymills Victorian Pumping Station - sewage pumps
SK2625 : Claymills Beam engine by Ashley Dace SK2625 : Claymills Beam engine SK2625 : Claymills Pumping Station by Ashley Dace SK2625 : Claymills Pumping Station

Coleham Pumping Station, Longden, Shrewsbury, Shropshire

This is another example of beam engines being installed long after they could have been considered an obsolete type. This sewage pumping station contains a pair built in 1900 by W R Renshaw & Co of Stoke on Trent. They are relatively small Woolf compound rotative engines with an expansion slide valve on the high pressure cylinder and Cornish drop valves on the low pressure. the cylinders are 13" x 46" and 21" x 54". Steam is supplied by a pair of Cornish boilers. The site has been restored to steam and it runs with no drama on just an occasional shovelful of coal.
SJ4912 : Coleham Sewage pumping station, Shrewsbury by Chris Allen SJ4912 : Coleham Sewage pumping station, Shrewsbury SJ4912 : Beam engine in Coleham Sewage Pumping Station by John M SJ4912 : Beam engine in Coleham Sewage Pumping Station
SJ4912 : Coleham Sewage Pumping Station by Chris Allen SJ4912 : Coleham Sewage Pumping Station

Combe Mill, Blenheim Estate, Witney, Oxfordshire

This mill on the Blenheim Estate used both water and steam power. The beam engine is a single cylinder four column beam engine believed to be by Thomas Piggott of Birmingham in 1852. The cylinder is 18" x 34" and the flywheel is 13' 6" diameter. Steam was provided by a Cornish boiler of the same date but this is now out of use and a modern boiler provides the steam. The steam engine last ran commercially in 1912 after 60 years of use and was first steamed in preservation in 1974, after more years out of use than in use.
SP4115 : Combe Saw Mill by Chris Allen SP4115 : Combe Saw Mill SP4115 : Beam engine, Combe Mill by Chris Allen SP4115 : Beam engine, Combe Mill
SP4115 : Stoking the boiler, Combe Saw Mill by Chris Allen SP4115 : Stoking the boiler, Combe Saw Mill

Cornish Mines and Engines Industrial Discovery Centre, Pool, Redruth, Cornwall

This site is actually composed of two separate sites either side of the old A30 road through Pool between Redruth and Camborne.

By far the most visible is the double acting rotative winding engine known as Michell's whim. This was built by Holman Bros locally in 1887 and the cylinder is 30" x 108" and it ran at up to 27 rpm. It was disused for many years but is now in the care of the National Trust and can be turned by an electric motor.
SW6741 : Michell's Engine House East Pool 1969 by Gordon Spicer SW6741 : Michell's Engine House East Pool 1969 SW6741 : East Pool Mine: Michell's Whim by Martin Bodman SW6741 : East Pool Mine: Michell's Whim
SW6741 : Michell's whim by Chris Allen SW6741 : Michell's whim SW6741 : Inside an operational Cornish Engine House, Camborne by Jeremy Bolwell SW6741 : Inside an operational Cornish Engine House, Camborne

The other engine is a short walk or drive away and is Taylor's 90 inch non-rotative Cornish beam pumping engine. This was built in 1892 by Harvey & Co of Hayle and installed here as recently as 1922 and worked until 28 September 1954. It is the largest in situ engine in Cornwall and the 90" cylinder has a stroke of 120" with a 108" stroke in the shaft. It is now owned by the National Trust and is currently static.
SW6741 : Taylor's Shaft , East Pool and Agar Mine by Helen Wilkinson SW6741 : Taylor's Shaft , East Pool and Agar Mine SW6741 : Taylor's Shaft, Pool by Chris Allen SW6741 : Taylor's Shaft, Pool

Crofton Pumping Station, Crofton, Marlborough, Wiltshire


SU2662 : Kennet & Avon Canal, Crofton by David StowellSU2662 : Kennet & Avon Canal, Crofton
This site is home to a pair of non-rotative Cornish beam engines that were used to pump water to the summit level of the Kennet & Avon Canal and can still do so. Indeed, one is the oldest engine still to be capable of doing its original job on its original site. The older one was built in 1812 by Boulton & Watt of the Soho Foundry, Birmingham and has a cylinder 42" bore by 96" stroke. The later engine was built in 1846 by Harvey & Co of Hayle to replace an 1809 engine. as built it was a Sims tandem compound working on the Cornish cycle but was rebuilt as a conventional single cylinder Cornish in 1904-5 with a 42" x 8' cylinder. The engines are now both operable and are demonstrated in steam several times each year.
SU2662 : The beams, Crofton by Chris Allen SU2662 : The beams, Crofton The 1812 beam is on the left.
SU2662 : Cornish engines, Crofton by Chris Allen SU2662 : Cornish engines, Crofton The 1812 valve gear is furthest from the photographer.

KML

( Page 1 2 3 4 5 )
You are not logged in login | register