The Great Yarmouth Rows today

( Page 1 ... 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 )
Text © Copyright Evelyn Simak, October 2018
Images are under a separate Creative Commons Licence.


Rows 97 - 103


Row 97 (Bell's Row aka Bayley's Row) ran from King Street to Howard Street and was named after John Bell (18111895), a sculptor who was born there and whose works were shown at the Great Exhibition of 1851. His best-known work is said to be the Crimean war monument to the Brigade of Guards at the junction of Pall Mall and Waterloo Place in London. According to Colin Tooke the name refers to Samuel Bell, a solicitor who lived in the row. At some time the row was also known as Bayley's Row (named after Joseph Bayley, a surgeon), Blick's Row, Nightingale the Confectioner's Row and Norfolk's Hero. Only the entrance passage at the eastern (King Street) end remains.



TG5207 : Houses adjacent to the King Street car park by Evelyn Simak
The passage of Row 97 can be seen at left. Row 99 was at right. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


Row 98 (Urquhart's Back Row) linked King Street and Deneside and in the 1920s is documented to have comprised 31 houses. It was built over by a mansion erected by Thomas Penrice, the grounds of which extended from St George's Plain to Row 94.

Row 99 (Castle Row) ran from 151 King Street to Middlegate Street. Its western section was demolished to make way for the King Street car park and only the passage at its eastern end remains. The row's name refers to a 12th century castle which once stood at its eastern end. The Penrice Arms public house was situated at the row's north-west corner. The building currently houses Lombard's pawn shop.


TG5207 : 151 King Street - Lombard Pawn Shop by Evelyn Simak
This building once used to house the Penrice Arms public house. A fortification is documented to once have stood here until its demolition in 1620 and a Thomas Penrice purchased the Castle Yard and built coach houses and stables. The entrance passage to Row 99 can be seen at its right-hand corner. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


Row 100 (Spooner's Row aka Fuller's South Row), which ran from South Quay to Middlegate Street, is now a cul-de-sac leading nowhere. At various times this row was also known as Fuller's South Row, JF Costertons Esqs Row, Sons of Commerce Row and Sowoll the Painter's Row.




Row 101 (Reynold's Row) ran from King Street to Middlegate Street and apart from the entrance passage at its eastern end it no longer exists.

TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 101 (Reynold's Row) by Evelyn Simak
The King Street (eastern) end of this row. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak



TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 101 (Reynold's Row) by Evelyn Simak
View west from the end of the passage. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak




Row 102 (Packet Office Row) ran from King Street to Middlegate Street. The Packet Office was situated in a house at the row's south-western corner and functioned as an office for the packet boat which during the war with France ran between Yarmouth and Cuxhaven with all mail destined for the Continent (except for Spain and Portugal) would leave by this route. Joseph Baker, a fish merchant and the father of George Errington senior's grandmother (see Row 113) lived in a large house at the north-east corner of this row, of which only a short passage remains at its eastern (King Street) end. This row was at various times also known as Williams' Row (in 1760), Arnold the Brewer's Row, William and Bells Row and Benett the Cooper's Row (in 1863).

TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 102 (Packet Office Row) by Evelyn Simak
Entrance from King Street. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak




TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 102 (Packet Office Row) by Evelyn Simak
This (part of an) old water pump on display in the Old Merchant's House Museum in Row 117 originates from house number 22 of Row 102 > LinkExternal link. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 102 (Packet Office Row) by Evelyn Simak
View east from the western end of the passage. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


Row 103 (Royal Exchange Row) linked Middlegate Street and South Quay and was named after the Royal Exchange public house located at 19 South Quay. Its western entrance passes through a large house built by John Andrews, believed to have been the largest herring merchant in Europe in his time. Palmer records that John Andrews had built his house up to the verge of his frontage and then found that he could not reach the front door without placing the steps beyond his limit. He therefore applied to the corporateion for leave to do so but due to an ongoing feud between the two parties his request was refused with the explanation that he could get into his house by means of a portable ladder as the Quakers did at their meeting house (in the early days, the floor of the meeting house was one metre below ground level and accessed by means of a stepladder). In 1812 the government purchased and converted the building to a Custom house, and the Port and Haven Commissioners still use it today. At various times the row was also known as Chapel Row, Custom House Row, Safferey the Brewer's Row (in 1836) Andrew's Row (in 1720) and North Custom House Row. The row, or what is left of it, appears to now be a short cul-de-sac with its entrance currently blocked by restoration work.

TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 103 by Evelyn Simak
The Rows were numbered in 1804 but today most of them also have a modern name sign in addition to their old number. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 103 by Evelyn Simak
On the east side of South Quay. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 103 by Evelyn Simak
Some serious restoration work would seem to be taking place here. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak



TG5207 : Custom House and Port and Haven Commissioner's Office by Evelyn Simak
The Grade II* listed building at left dates from 1720 and was built for John Andrews, an important herring merchant. It was purchased in 1802 by H.M. Government for use as a Custom House and in 1986 sold to the Port of Yarmouth Commissioners. Adjacent at right is the Port and Haven Commissioner's Offices built in 1909 by Olley & Haward and Grade 2 listed. The archways at the left and right corners of the Custom House were the entrance passages to rows 103 and 104 respectively.
by Evelyn Simak


KML

( Page 1 ... 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 )
You are not logged in login | register