The Great Yarmouth Rows today

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Text © Copyright Evelyn Simak, October 2018
Images are under a separate Creative Commons Licence.


Rows 104 - 110


Row 104 (Swanard's Row aka Customs House Row) ran from South Quay to Middlegate Street. It was also known as Customs House Row because its entrance passage from South Quay is situated between the 18th century Custom House and the Port and Haven Commissioners' Offices. Other names recorded for this row are Martin's Row (in 1750), Friendly Society Row, Custom House South Row, Robert Warmingtons Row (in 1790) and Dr Collier's Row (in 1898). Swanard's refers to the time when the keeper of the town's swans lived there. The row was demolished and only the passage at its western end remains. An old well has survived in what is now the Great Yarmouth Library Community Garden at its eastern end.



TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 104 (Swanard's Row) by Evelyn Simak
View west from near the eastern end of the row. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 104 (Swanard's Row) by Evelyn Simak
Approaching the eastern end. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Tolhouse Street - The Salvation Army by Evelyn Simak
The eastern entrance to Row 104 was at the building's left-hand corner. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : The Great Yarmouth Library Community Garden by Evelyn Simak
An old well with a modern cover. It would once have been situated in Row 104. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


Row 105 (Chapel Row) linked Middlegate and King streets and its name refers to the then open plain where St George's Chapel (now the St George's Theatre) was built in 1714. Yarmouth Way was built over part of it.

Row 106 (Town House Row aka Gaol Row) linked Middlegate Street and South Quay and it was named after a 16th century building known as Town House where the town dues from all shipping and merchandise were collected and which stood at the row's north-western corner. The name Gaol Row refers to the Tolhouse at the row's eastern end. Other names recorded for this row were Three Cranes Row, Gaol North Row, Couldhams (in 1578), Dutch Chapel Row and Palgrave's Row. The row was demolished and the public library and the road leading to it were built on the site.


TG5207 : The public library in Gaol Row aka Town House Row (Row 106) by Evelyn Simak
Row 106 has been razed to the ground to make way for a road. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak



TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 106 (Town House Row) by Evelyn Simak
View west from what used to be the row's eastern end. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


Row 107 (Post House Row) ran from Middlegate Street to 145 King Street, which used to be the St George Church Rooms. The town's first post office is documented to have been established in house number 5 which was situated on the north side. The post office was later moved to Row 63. The row was also known as Chapel Paved Row, Step Paved Row, St Georges East Row and Old Post House Row. This was the only row which had steps leading down to it from the road. The steps have since been replaced by a ramp.

TG5207 : 145 King Street by Evelyn Simak
Formerly St George Church Rooms, it the building dates from 1891 and was designed by Charles Baker. It is Grade 2 listed. See also > LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak



TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 107 (Post House Row) by Evelyn Simak
View east. A ramp has replaced the steps at the entrance. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak



Row 108 (Walking Row) ran from Middlegate Street to South Quay and its name refers to the fact that it was the first of the rows to be paved with flagstones. It was also known as John Fisher's Row (in 1802), England's Row (in 1676), Gaol Paved Row, Free Library Row and Anthony Taylor's Row. The entrance passage at its western end is still in place but a house was built over it. A path further to the east marks the row's location.

TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 108 (Walking Row) by Evelyn Simak
This street light is an older version than the ones seen in the other rows, which are very similar but lack the ornamental detail. It can be seen at the eastern end of the row. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 108 (Walking Row) by Evelyn Simak
On the east side of South Quay. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 108 (Walking Row) by Evelyn Simak
View west from the eastern end of what is left of this row. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 108 (Walking Row) by Evelyn Simak
View east. The building at left is the public library. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


Row 109 (Red Lion Row aka Lion and Lamb Row) linked King and Middlegate streets. One of the row's names refers to the Lion an Lamb public house which was located on the south-eastern corner of the row, at 140 King Street. At various times the row was also known as Dr Borrett's Row (after Dr Borrett who lived there) and Dr Meadow's Row, who lived in a row house known as Doctor's House. Townshend Close was built on the site of this row.

TG5207 : Libertys Rock Café on King Street by Evelyn Simak
Libertys Rock Café used to be the Red Lion public house. The eastern end of Row 109 is at its right-hand corner. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak




TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 109 (Red Lion Row) by Evelyn Simak
View east towards King Street. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Townshend Close, off Tolhouse Street by Evelyn Simak
This was the location of Row 109. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


Row 110 (Perry the Oatmeal Maker's Row aka Bellamy the Butcher's Row) linked King Street and Middlegate Street. It was overbuilt by a road and housing known as Townshend Close and only the passage at its eastern (King Street) end remains. In the early 19th century the row was also known as New Prison Row because during the last long war with France several old buildings on the row's north side and extending to the next row, were coverted to a prison. CJ Palmer reports that very aperture was bricked up, with the exception of one door with an iron grating through which the prisoners were supplied with bones which they could carve to relieve their boredom. A sentinel stood at each end of the row and after dark no one not knowing the password was allowed past. Despite all these measures it frequently happened that prisoners escaped. The wife of Ives Hurry, whose house stood at the north-western corner of the row and abutted the prison is said to have taken a compassionate interest in the prisoners and to have contributed largely to their comfort. Townshend Close now occupies the location of this row.


TG5207 : Townshend Close, off Tolhouse Street by Evelyn Simak
The entrance passages to rows 119 and 110 can be seen in the background to the left and the right of the white house. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


KML

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