The Great Yarmouth Rows today

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Text © Copyright Evelyn Simak, October 2018
Images are under a separate Creative Commons Licence.


Rows 111 - 116


Row 111 (Luson's Row) ran from South Quay to Middlegate Street, skirting the south side of 26 South Quay (now the Nelson Museum). Three of this row's houses were restored and one of these, now referred to as the Row 111 House, and has since been turned into a museum. The row was named after William Luson who owned a large house situated between Rows 111 and 112 which was later used by the Yarmouth College. At various times the row was also known as Sir Eaton Traver's Row, Lucas' Row and Steward's Row.

TG5207 : Car park by the Nelson Museum off South Quay by Evelyn Simak
For a frontal view of the building, the side of which can be seen here, and some information see > LinkExternal link. The car park was where Row 111 once stood. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 111 (Luson's Row) by Evelyn Simak
View east from the row's western end. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 111 (Luson's Row) by Evelyn Simak
View west across Hall Quay from the western end of Row 111. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 111 Luson's Row by Evelyn Simak
This old bollard is situated at the South Quay (western) end of Row 111. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak



TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 111 (Luson's Row) by Evelyn Simak
The Row 111 House, dating from the 17th century, is now a museum. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : View east from Sackville Close by Evelyn Simak
This was the location of Row 111. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 111 (Luson's Row) by Evelyn Simak
This was the location of the row as seen from Tolhouse Street. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


Row 112 (Holmes South Row aka Tomkin's School Row) ran from South Quay to Middlegate Street and one of its names refers to Leonard Holmes who was a bailiff in 1623 and lived in a house located between Rows 111 and 112. The row houses were demolished and its western end now is the car park beside the Nelson Museum. Sackville Close was built over its eastern section.


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 112 (Holmes South Row) by Evelyn Simak
View west towards South Quay. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


Row 113 (Tilson's South Row aka Errington Row and Ferrier the Surgeon’s Row) ran from King Street to Middlegate. It was named after Thomas Tilson, a member of the Corporation in 1626, who lived in the property at the King Street end of the row. George Errington senior lived in a house at the south-east corner of Row 113 in what then was Chapel Street and was extensively engaged in the herring fishery. Although Row 113 is relatively short, 83 people from 17 families lived there in 1841. They were Joseph Parnell (60), a shoemaker and a smacksman as his lodger (his cottage had two rooms) and Selina Chapman, a dressmaker, with three lodgers (a ropemaker, a shipwright and a stationer's assistant). Also living in the Row were a sailmaker, two lamp lighters, two fishermen, a mariner, a general carter and an army pensioner of the 9th Regiment. By 1911, the row was home to a gas fitter, a commission agent, a coachman to a doctor, an oilskin dresser, a stationary engine driver at the gas company, a blacksmith’s apprentice, two council labourers, an apprentice house painter, a fish hawker, a kinomatograph apprentice, a fisherman, a dock labourer, a fish worker, an errand boy, a nursemaid, a potato dealer and a tripe shop assistant. Only the entrance passage remains on its eastern end. Norfolk Heritage records that in 1954 the foundations of 17th century houses and a 12th century cooking pot were found during the digging of a sewer trench. The pot is now on display in the Old Merchants House museum in Row 117.



Row 114 (Lieutenant White's Row). This short row runs from King Street to Deneside a short distance further to the east, and is mainly intact. This row was also known as Willis' Half Row.

TG5207 : The David Howkins Museum of Memories by Evelyn Simak
At 39/40 King Street. This building dates from 1912 and is Grade 2 listed. It currently houses a privately owned and funded museum but once used to be the home of the Great Yarmouth Gas Company and is being described by National Heritage as a rare surviving building type and one of the very earliest surviving gas showrooms. The western end of Row 114 emerges on King Street by its northern corner. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 114 (Lieutenant White's Row) by Evelyn Simak
The western end of the Row as seen from King Street. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak




Row 115 (Nathaniel Fish's Row aka Batchelor's Row) links King Street and Deneside and is still in place. Nathaniel Fish as well as Thomas Horatio Batchelor lived in the house, at different times, at the row's north-western corner which later became the office of the Yarmouth Gas Company. At present it is the Kings Wine Bar, located at 42 King Street.

TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 115 (Nathaniel Fish's Row) by Evelyn Simak
The entrance to the row from King Street is immediately south of Kings Wine Bar > LinkExternal link. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak



TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 115 (Nathaniel Fish's Row) by Evelyn Simak
The eastern end of the row looking west, as seen from Deneside. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


Row 116 (Sam Hurry's Row aka Hasting's Row and Pawnbrokers Row) ran from 133 King Street to 39 Middlegate Street. The row is named after Samuel Hurry (born 1727), the son of Thomas Hurry, a Yarmouth hemp and iron merchant, whose house was situated on the south-east corner of the row. Samuel Hurry was in the Merchant Navy, and soon after the accession of George III and after the Seven Year War had ended in 1763 he was employed on the coast of America and France in ships transporting goods. By 1763 he had launched his own ship, called the Pitt (after William Pitt) - described in the Norwich Gazette as the largest vessel launched in Yarmouth for many years - and became a general merchant. Samuel Hurry was presented with a silver cup for giving aid to the shipwrecked sailors during the great gale of 31 October 1789. When he died in 1800 aged 74 years he left his large fortune including hist estates at Badingham, Peasenhall and Bedingfield (all in Suffolk) to his grandchildren. The row was at various times also known as Thomas Hurry's Row, Plummer's School Row, Plummer's Row and Hastings the Pawnbroker's Row. Only a short passage remains at its King Street end, together with an old cast iron cannon bollard beside it.

TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 116 (Sam Hurry's Row) by Evelyn Simak
View west. Note the cast iron early 19th century cast iron cannon bollard in the foreground (at left) which is Grade 2 listed. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 116 (Sam Hurry's Row) by Evelyn Simak
The Grade 2 listed cannon bollard at the eastern entrance to the row. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak



TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 116 (Sam Hurry's Row) by Evelyn Simak
View east from the western end of the passage. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 116 (Sam Hurry's Row) by Evelyn Simak
Passage into a yard on the south side. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 116 (Sam Hurry's Row) by Evelyn Simak
Short alley linking with Row 113 and leading to Townshend Close, which may not have existed when the rows were still in place. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


KML

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