The Great Yarmouth Rows today

( Page 1 ... 13 14 15 16 17 18 )
Text © Copyright Evelyn Simak, October 2018
Images are under a separate Creative Commons Licence.


Rows 130 - 145


Row 130 (St Peter's Row) ran from Middlegate Street to King Street and at various times was also known as St Peter's East Row, White Lion North Row and Old White Lion Row, named after the Old White Lion public house at the row's south-eastern corner, at 112 King Street, said to be the oldest surviving domestic building in Yarmouth. The row was demolished and Nottingham Way built over it.

TG5207 : 112 King Street - The Old White Lion (former) public house by Evelyn Simak
The building is Grade II* listed and is said to be the oldest surviving domestic building in Yarmouth. It stood on the south-eastern corner of Row 130 which was demolished and has recently been converted to flats. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : View along Nottingham Way by Evelyn Simak
The road was built on the site of Row 130. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 130 by Evelyn Simak
The only house left of this row. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


The locations of the 17 rows once located between Nottingham Way in the north, South Quay in the west, King Street in the east and Friary Lane in the south are today occupied by council flats in Sidney Close, Burleigh Close and Clarendon Close west of Middlegate, and blocks of flats between Middlegate and King Street further to the east in the area now known as the Middlegate Estate.

Row 131 (Woolverton the Cooper's Row aka Beckett's Row and White Lion South Row) linked Middlegate Street and King Street. Today, an alley off King Street follows the location of the row, which is recorded to have had eight shops, for approximately half of its original length. A housing estate was built on the site.




TG5207 : Flats south of Nottingham Way by Evelyn Simak
This was the site of Row 131. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


Row 132 (Dover Court Row) ran from Middlegate Street to South Quay and was at various times also known as Present (or Breazant) the Butcher's Row (in 1836), Delf's Row, Cook Ellis' Row, Adam the Barber's Row, Marsh's Row, Orfeur's Row and Court Row.

Row 133 (Bellamy the Baker's Row) linked Middlegate Street and South Quay and no longer exists. Other names recorded for this row are Trendle's Row (in 1624), Crisp the Carter's Row, Spratt the Shoemaker's Row, Union Row (in 1707), Graves the Pieman's Row, Lee the Pawnbroker's Row, and John Cooper's North Row. John Cooper was a grocer who owned a shop at the eastern end of the row. John Trendle was a bailiff and lived in a house at the western end of the row on the site of which the Bell and Crown public house was later built at 45 South Quay.

TG5207 : Entrance to Clarendon Court as seen from Middlegate by Evelyn Simak
This was the location of rows 133 and 136. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


Row 134 (Echard's Row) linked Middlegate and King Street and was at various times also known as Wake's Row, New White Lion Row and Knights the Baker's Row. The New White Lion public house was located at the north-eastern corner of the row at 106 King Street. The site was overbuilt with a housing estate.

TG5207 : Yard off King Street by Evelyn Simak
This was the location of Row 134. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 134 (Echard's Row) by Evelyn Simak
The tower of the church of St Spyridon (formerly St Peter) can be seen in the background. This was the location of Row 134, which extended further to the west from here to Middlegate. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


Row 135 (Hayes the Butcher's Row aka Tomlinson's Arms Row and Old Prison Row) linked Middlegate Street and King Street. At some time it was also named after Thomas Emms, who lived at the north-western corner and his house was later converted to the Tomlinson Arms public house, at 67 Middlegate Street.

Row 135 (Cock Half Row aka Blanchflower's Half Row) was a cul-de sac turning off King Street and leading to the rear of the Cock Tavern public house located at 74/76 Middlegate Street. Blanchflowers was a potted meat and game factory (later the Co-op Caning Factory) situated at 95/97 King Street, on the corner of the half row.

Row 136 (Bracey's Row) linked Middlegate Street and South Quay and at various times was also known as Almshouse Row, New Fountain Row, Three Herrings Row and John Cooper's South Row. One of its names refers to the Three Herrings public house located at the row's south-western corner, at 50 South Quay. Andrew Bracey was a mayor who in 1714 lived in a house at the north-western corner of the row, which marked the southern boundary of the Custom House Quay.

Row 137 (Grief's Row) ran from Middlegate Street to South Quay. Other names recorded for this row, which in the 19th century is documented to have had 27 inhabitants, are Cart and Horse Row, Horse and Cart Row, GD Palmer's Row and Rose and Crown Row (various names of a public house situated at 137 Middlegate Street).

TG5206 : 1-24 Burleigh Close off Middlegate by Evelyn Simak
This was the location of rows 137 and 138. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


Row 138 (Dog and Duck Row aka Union Row) linked Middlegate Street and South Quay and in the 19th century was named after the Dog and Duck public house at its north-western corner, at 56 South Quay.

Row 138 ran north-south and linked Rows 137 and 138. The cottages in this row are documented to have been named Durrants Cottages and in 1874 had eight residents.

Row 139 (Paget's Row aka Matthew the Baker's Row and Mission to Seamen Row) linked Middlegate Street and South Quay. In the early 19th century Samuel Paget, whose son was Sir James Paget (the surgeon after whom the James Paget Hospital in Gorleston is named) built a house on the south-western corner of the row.

TG5206 : The rear of flats on South Quay by Evelyn Simak
As seen from Sidney Close where Row 139 once stood. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5206 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 139 (Paget's Row) by Evelyn Simak
This tablet commemorates Sir James Paget (the James Paget Hospital in nearby Gorleston is named after him) who was born in the house where it had originally been placed and which stood on the south-western corner of Row 139. If the tablet, which does look original, was reset in its original position, the row was situated a short distance further to the north. For a wider view of this location see > LinkExternal link. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5206 : Entrance to Sidney Close from Middlegate by Evelyn Simak
Sidney Close is the location where Row 139 once stood. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


Row 140 (Liverpool Tavern Row) was at various times also known as Earl St Vincent Row, Ives the Antiquary's Row, Pigeon Row, Dene Well Row and Stevenson's Row and linked Middlegate Street and King Street. The Earl St Vincent public house was located at the row's south-eastern corner, at 93 King Street, opposite the junction with Alma Road. The Liverpool Tavern was at the row's south-western corner, at 80 Middlegate Street. A housing estate was built on the site.

Row 141 (Spotted Cow Row) ran from Middlegate to King Street and was named after the Spotted Cow (later Nelson) Tavern at 89 King Street, on the row's south-eastern corner. The row was at various times also known as Nelson Tavern Row, Child the Blacksmith's Row and Houghton the Baker's Row. A housing estate now occupies the site.

Row 142 (Peacock's Row) was named after the Peacock public house located at its north-eastern corner at 111/112 Middlegate Street, and it linked Middlegate Street and South Quay. At various times the row was also known as Mariner's Compass Row, Fishing Boat Row, Felstead's Row, Bailiff Felstead's Row, Bailiff Thaxter's Row, Peacock's Fish House Row, Pigeon's Row, Kerrison's Coffee Tavern Row and Blood and Guts Row. The house at number 60, at the north-western corner of the row, stood on the site of an ancient messuage which in the early 17th century as the residence of Thomas Felstead.

Row 143 (Grosse's Row) ran from Middlegate Street to South Quay. It was demolished in the late 19th century and the Seamen's Mission Church and Institute were built on the site. Other names recorded for this row are Maye the Baker's Row, Pleasant the Grocer's Row, Woodroffe the Grocer's Row and Morling the Grocer's Row.

Row 144 (Jone's Row), the southern-most row in King Street, ran from Middlegate Street to King Street and at various times was also known as Neave's Row, Mayer's Row, Thorndick's Row and Southgate the Butcher's Row. It was situated just north of Friars Lane where a housing estate now occupies the site.

Row 145 (Fourteen Stars Row), the last of the rows to have received a number in 1804, was named after the Fourteen Stars (later the Nottingham Arms) public house located at its north eastern corner, at 104 Middlegate Street. The row was also at various times known as Nag's Head Row (in 1700), Hat and Feather Row (in 1730) and Nottingham Arms Row (in 1867). The Nags Head public house was situated at the row's south-western corner at 66 South Quay.

TG5206 : Flats on Friars Lane by Evelyn Simak
This was the location of Row 145. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


-------

References:

Norfolk Public Houses website - LinkExternal link
Norfolk Heritage Explorer, the Rows: LinkExternal link
The Norfolk Library website has many old photographs of the Rows: LinkExternal link

Charles John Palmer - The perlustration of Great Yarmouth: with Gorleston and Southtown
(3 volumes, 1872-1875)
Colin Tooke - The Rows of Great Yarmouth (1987)
Bronwen Riley - Great Yarmouth Row Houses and Greyfriars Cloister (2011)

Newspaper cuttings concerning the Rows including a list of names prior to 1900, compiled by Harry B Johnson, 1853.
Norfolk Record Office: MC 2659
List of the Rows in Great Yarmouth, 1855.
Norfolk Record Office: MC 2763
Drainage and flushing of the Rows, maps and plans, 1891-1894.
Norfolk Record Office: Y/BE 1/43-44



KML

( Page 1 ... 13 14 15 16 17 18 )
You are not logged in login | register