The Great Yarmouth Rows today

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Text © Copyright Evelyn Simak, October 2018
Images are under a separate Creative Commons Licence.


Rows 31 - 45 & Market Row

Row 31 (Nine Parish Row), which once formed the northern boundary of the land owned by the White Friars and ran from North Quay and George Street. Terraced houses have since been built over the south side of the western section and business premises stand adjacent in the east. Patterson Close, a new road giving access to modern flats adjoining in the east, was built over part of the row. CJ Palmer records that it was only a little more than two metres wide at one end. He also mentions estensive malthouses situated at the row's western end which had been built on a garden that once belonged to the Carmelites, and the existence of a small cellar of great antiquity beneath a modern cottage.



TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 31 by Evelyn Simak
View east approaching Patterson Close. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 31 by Evelyn Simak
View west towards North Quay. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 31 by Evelyn Simak
The course of the row as seen from Patterson square. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


Row 32 (Kings Head South Row aka Kings Head South Row) linked the Market Place and Howard Street and ran parallel to Row 29. The row was demolished and overbuilt with the police station. It had been named after the Kings Head public house which was located at 48 King Street. Rows 32, 33 and 34 divided the North or St Nicholas' ward from the Market ward. The division was carried from Row 32 across the Market Place and along St Nicholas' Road to the beach and from Row 34 across North Quay along Quay Mill Road to the River Yare.

TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 32 (Kings Head South Row) by Evelyn Simak
View west. Only the passage remains. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


Row 33 (Dr Farmington's aka Nightingale the Barber's Row) ran from George Street to Howard Street.

Row 34 (Quay Mill Row) ran from North Quay to George Street. A post windmill, known as the Quay Mill, used to be situated near its western end until 1799, when it was pulled down. The Cherry Tree Tea Gardens, from which the terrace named Cherry Tree Cottages (built in 1897) takes its name, was located on the north side of the row, at its eastern end. CL Palmer records that three almshouses, which the Guardians of the Poor sold in 1842, were located in the row. He also mentions the Cherry Tree Gardens, situated on the north side of the row and much frequented by the public. During his time the vinery belonging to these gardens was also still in place.


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 34 (Quay Mill Row) by Evelyn Simak
View west. The terrace at left is called Cherrytree Cottages. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 34 (Quay Mill Row) by Evelyn Simak
View west from the eastern end of this row. The terrace at right is called Cherry Tree Cottages > LinkExternal link. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak



TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 34 (Quay Mill Row) by Evelyn Simak
The western end of this row. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


Row 34 was a short cul-de-sac off North-Quay. Today this is a short path skirting the south side and the rear of the house which has replaced the Eagle Tavern which stood here. The path links with Row 34.

TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 34½ by Evelyn Simak
The entrance from North Quay, looking east. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 34½ by Evelyn Simak
The eastern end of the row. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


Row 35 (Globe Row), named after the Globe public house (Palmer describes it as disreputable) located on the south-west corner of the row, ran from 19 Market Place to Howard Street and was also known as Harman's Row, Bailiff Rowe's Row Freemason's Arms Row and later as Leach's Row.

Row 36 (Garden Row) aka Neil (or Neal) the Shoemaker's Row and Mouse the Pawnbroker's Row. It linked George and Howard streets and one of its names is derived from the gardens fronting the houses on the north side of the row which can be seen in an 1890s print from the Percy Trett Collection. Arthur Patterson, the renowned naturalist, was born in this row in 1857.

Row 37 (Glasshouse Row aka Absolon's Row) ran from George Street to North Quay. It was named after the glass works of William Absolon. Palmer mentions old malthouses at the south-eastern corner which extended halfway down the row on the south side.

Row 38 (Ferrier's Row aka Charles Moore's Row and Ellis the Brushmaker's Row) ran from Market Place to Howard Street. One of its names derives from the Ferrier family, who lived on the corner. Richard Ferrier was bailiff in 1691, and William Smith Ferrier (born 1804) worked as a surgeon in the Great Yarmouth Hospital and the Coroner for the Borough from 1836 to 1848. The entrance passage from Market Square is intact. The adjacent row was demolished.

TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 38 (Ferrier's Row) by Evelyn Simak
Entrance into the passage from Market Square (view west). LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak




Row 39 (Norman the Cabinet Maker's Row) linked Howard and George Streets. CJ Palmer records that this row at some time was also known as Blower's Row after a house and shop in Charlotte Street.

Row 40 (Wall the Linen Drapers Row) was also known as Fulcher the Grocer's Row and Taylor and Fulcher's Row. Row 40, together with Row 43, was built over.

Row 41 (Rose and Crown Row aka Kings Baker's Row) linked George and Howard streets and was named after the Rose and Crown public house at 45 Howard Street, at its eastern end.

Row 42 (Barnby the Liquor Merchant's Row aka Hunt the Glazier's Row) ran from George Street to Howard Street and was also known as Jews Row and Synagogue Row, after the synagogue which was located in this row during the 19th century.

Row 43 (Dassett's Row) ran from Howard Street to Market Place and was also known as Hogarth's Row, Taylor and Fulcher's South Row and Moon the Cabinet Maker's Row. The Yarmouth historian CJ Palmer in his Perlustration (Volume I, published in 1872) describes the row as very narrow and gloomy and built over at the east end, with lofty houses on each side.

Row 44 (Angel Row aka Markland's Row) ran from the Market Place to Howard Street and one of its names derives from the Angel Hotel which was located on its south-eastern corner, facing the Market Square. The hotel, one of Yarmouth's oldest inns, was demolished in 1957. The entrance passage from Market Place still exists, as does one house on the north side, beyond which the row has been demolished. Francis Markland's chemists shop was situated at the north-eastern corner.

TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 44 (Angel Row) by Evelyn Simak
View west through the passage leading beneath houses on Market Square. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 44 (Angel Row) by Evelyn Simak
View east towards the Market Square. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Row 44 (Angel Row) by Evelyn Simak
The substation at left is situated where row houses once stood. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak



Row 45 (Woolsey's School Row aka Singens Row and St Johns Head Row) ran from George Street to North Quay. CJ Palmer points out that 'Syngen' (the name of the row as written in old deeds) represents the old pronounciation of 'St John'. Presumably one of the row's names is derived from the St Johns Head public house located at its western end. This short row is still in place.

Market Row was one the few rows which never received a number. The row is still in place, extending from the Market Market to Howard Street, further to the west. Despite the row being much frequented by pedestrians it remained open for carts as late as 1784, when as the result of a petition of the inhabitants, the corporation ordered one of their old cannons to be put down as a post at the western end. The row was subsequently paved with flagstones and became a favourite location for shops, several dating from the late 16th or early 17th centuries. By 1836, 42 traders are documented to have been established in the row. A passage near the western end now links with Row 46.

TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Market Row by Evelyn Simak
The entrance to the row on Market Square. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Market Row by Evelyn Simak
This row is full of shops, hence its name. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak



TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Market Row by Evelyn Simak
Approaching the western end of the row. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak



TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Market Row by Evelyn Simak
Set back from within the row. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak





TG5207 : Great Yarmouth's Rows - Market Row by Evelyn Simak
The turn-off to Row 46 which runs parallel with Market Row immediately to the north. LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


KML

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