Image Type Tags update

Published: 6 November 2016
Images submitted to Geograph are classified as Geograph, Supplemental or Reject. These classifications have historically been shown in various places throughout the website, (and may continue on little used pages for some time).

To provide more detailed feedback to the contributor and to improve searching, the term Supplemental will no longer be used. All images will be assigned one of seven Image Type Tags (ITTs) by a moderator at initial moderation. The tags are: Geograph, Cross Grid, Aerial, Inside, Close Look, Extra and Reject. These tags will appear where the Classification previously appeared. A point will only be awarded for a Geograph, the criteria for which remain the same: see Geograph or SupplementalExternal link

There is no intention to alter the set of images that are Geographs. Considerations about Aerial, Inside, Close Look and Extra only come into play if a moderator has decided that an image is not a Geograph for some reason. Cross Grid is applied automatically (see below).

This change is effective from 14:00 10 November 2016. For the foreseeable future, any legacy image that is not a Geograph or a Reject will not have an Image Type Tag and so the various display fields on the website will appear either blank or as unknown. See below.

Note: Six Image Type Tags were first introduced in May 2016. One of them, Detail, proved unsatisfactory for some images. After consultation, Detail has been replaced by Close Look and Extra. This update offers guidance on all seven ITTs, with some examples of images to which Close Look and Extra might be applied.

Geograph

Where the photographer and subject are in the same 1km grid square. A picture of an aspect of the grid square, or prominent feature of the grid square, showing the context of its geographical location. In other words, a picture giving the viewer a good idea of the general topography of the area; what the area within the square looks like. Geograph or SupplementalExternal link

Cross Grid

Where the photographer and subject are in different 1 km grid squares. This will be calculated from the Subject and Photographer grid references, and applied automatically, right or wrong.

Aerial

Images taken from the air, i.e. while not connected to the ground. The view may be from an aircraft, drone, balloon or other airborne device.

Inside

Images not taken outside but inside, indoors, underground, undercover. Images of large natural features like caves may be classified differently. Views out of such spaces towards the outside, e.g. a view out of a window, could be a Geograph if enough context is visible.

Close Look

Images that are not a Geograph by virtue of one or more of the following reasons:–

Note that the Close Look Image Type Tag does not imply anything about the distance between the camera and the subject. A Close Look can be obtained by a variety of technical means including cropping, use of a telephoto lens, or placing the camera close to the subject. It is desirable, where appropriate, for an image to have more than one Image Type Tag (e.g. many Inside images would also be Close Look). See examples below.

Extra

Images that cannot be classified as a Geograph because the geographical features are not sufficiently large and clearly shown; which do not fall into any of Cross grid, Aerial, Close Look or Inside image types, but are considered a useful addition to the project collection because they add something Extra (so that rejection is considered inappropriate).

The following types of view may fall into this image type:
Note: The article Reasons for rejectionExternal link makes it clear that images with no geographical content or context are candidates for rejection. Contributors should not submit such images unless there is sufficient information in the description to link the image to the geographical location.

Reject

An image that is not suitable for use on the website because:–

Comment

The Image Types Tags are allocated at initial moderation. It is quite possible for an image to have more than one Image Type Tag. For example, many Inside images would also be Close Look images.

As explained above, any legacy image that is not a Geograph or a Reject would not have an Image Type Tag and so the various display fields on the website will appear blank. Any contributor could use the current Tagging box to add Image Type Tags to their own legacy images, although no change of Classification would take place. It is envisaged that a software tool for bulk Image Type Tagging will be made available in due course.

Examples of Close Look

1) Close Look

2) Close Look

3) Close Look

4) Close Look

5) Close Look
SK0941 : Mile Post on the edge of Denstone by Linda Bailey
Although the mile post occupies only a small part of the image, and hence it might be seen as having considerable context in relation to its size, it is still not a geograph.


6) Close Look

7) Close Look
J3374 : Dean Crooks plaque, Belfast (December 2014) by Albert Bridge
The whole of a thing, but part of the building.


8) Close Look

9) Close Look
SE2333 : Harley Gardens, Leeds by Mark Stevenson
This kind of picture might be a borderline Geograph, but if it is decided that it isn't a Geograph (because of insufficient context or cut-off of the chimney), it is a Close Look.


10) Close Look
NX9776 : Victoria Terrace: Home of J M Barrie by Anne Barclay
This kind of picture might be a borderline Geograph, but if it is decided that it isn't a Geograph (because of insufficient context or cut-off of the top of the building), it is a Close Look.


11) Close Look

12) Close Look
NT5578 : Sea King helicopter by William Starkey
This would have been a candidate for rejection had the description not linked it to an airshow. (This image is not a Cross Grid but, even if it were, it is still also a Close Look.)


13) Close Look
SU1429 : The top of the spire, Salisbury Cathedral by Peter Facey
Despite the camera to subject distance being probably around 170m.


14) Close Look
J0053 : Mail train, Portadown by Albert Bridge
Subjects that move are not geographical features. Images of them cannot be Geographs unless the part that isn't a mobile subject is a Geograph in its own right. In this photo the bits of track shown are not enough to constitute a Geograph.


15) Close Look
NS6362 : Glasgow tram 1176 at Auchenshuggle terminus. by Chris Coleman
Subjects that move are not geographical features. Images of them cannot be Geographs unless the part that isn't a mobile subject is a Geograph in its own right. In this photo the bits of road and trees shown are not enough to constitute a Geograph.


16) Geograph
NS6362 : Glasgow trams at Auchenshuggle terminus by Chris Coleman
Although the trams are mobile, there is sufficient of the road and trees to make this a Geograph.


Examples of Extra

17) Extra
SZ6299 : Gosport Ferry, Portsmouth Harbour by Peter Trimming
Things on the sea that are not shown sufficiently close to constitute a Close Look


18) Extra
TG2142 : Hotel de Paris, Cromer - silhouette by Colin Park
It's hard to argue that this lacks context because if it were front-lit it would probably be a geograph. It doesn't seem to qualify as a Close Look. Silhouettes of this kind may be candidates for rejection for lack of geographical content. If it is accepted, it's an Extra.


19) Extra
TL4561 : Arbury sunset by H Heasley
Images of this kind may be candidates for rejection for lack of geographical content. If it is accepted, it's an Extra.


20) Extra
TA0233 : Skidby Mill by John Thirkettle
Silhouettes of this kind may be candidates for rejection for lack of geographical content. If it is accepted, it's an Extra.


21) Extra
J5082 : Aurora Borealis from Bangor by Rossographer
Images of this kind may be candidates for rejection, but if they are accepted they are Extras.


22) Extra
NY7169 : Feathery cloud at dusk by Karl and Ali
Images of this kind may be candidates for rejection, but if they are accepted they are Extras.



Authors: Peter FaceyExternal link, David P HowardExternal link and Robin StottExternal link
Updated 15 November 2016.
Creative Commons Licence [Some Rights Reserved]   Text © Copyright November 2016, Robin Stott; licensed for reuse under a Creative Commons Licence.
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