Lower Largo and the Serpentine Walk

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Creative Commons Licence [Some Rights Reserved]   Text © Copyright April 2019, Bill Kasman; licensed for re-use under a Creative Commons Licence.
Images also under a similar Creative Commons Licence.


Section Two: The Serpentine Walk

This path has been in existence for at least 300 years and was once the main connecting route between Upper Largo and Lower Largo. Today, looked after by The Woodland Trust, it is a rough track and, although it can be wet and muddy at times, it is well-used by dog walkers and others out for a pleasant stroll on a sunny afternoon. Here and there along its length, there are signs that it once had a much better surface and was an important thoroughfare LinkExternal link There are three main ways to access the Walk - one from the A915 road between Lundin Links and Upper Largo and two within the village itself.

NO4203 : The Serpentine Walk by Bill Kasman
Seen from the A915 this is the Upper Largo end of the Serpentine Walk, an old path which connects Upper Largo to Lower Largo.
See Lower Largo article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO4203 : The Serpentine Walk by Bill Kasman
This is the gate leading to the Serpentine Walk to Lower Largo from the A915 Upper Largo end. The green building houses a gas junction pipe.
See Lower Largo article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO4203 : The Serpentine Walk by Bill Kasman
At the Upper Largo (A915) end of the Serpentine Walk, this 'Scotways' (Scottish Rights of Way and Access Society) sign points the way. 'Temple' is the name given to the eastern part of the village.
See Lower Largo article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO4202 : The Serpentine Walk, Lower Largo by Bill Kasman
The Serpentine Walk approaches Lower Largo. This is the most easterly of two access points to the walk from the village.
See Lower Largo article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO4202 : The Serpentine Walk, Lower Largo by Bill Kasman
The Serpentine Walk leaves Lower Largo. This is the most easterly of the two access points in the village.
See Lower Largo article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO4202 : Fife Coastal Path by Bill Kasman
From where the Serpentine Walk leaves Lower Largo (to the left) the Fife Coastal Path heads east. This was once the route of the Fife Coast Railway and there was a pedestrian level crossing here. It is now the route of the Fife Coastal Path.
See Lower Largo article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO4202 : The Serpentine Walk, Lower Largo by Bill Kasman
From where the Serpentine Walk leaves Lower Largo (to the right) the road ahead leads to the waste water treatment plant. After a few hundred metres a path branches to the left off this road and leads to the previous location of Lower Largo Railway Station. This was the route of the Fife Coast Railway and there used to be a pedestrian level crossing here. The road to the left leads to Main Street.
See Lower Largo article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO4202 : Main Street, Lower Largo by Bill Kasman
Taken from Main Street this photograph shows Main Street heading left towards the most easterly of the two access points to the Serpentine Walk within the village. To the right the road becomes Temple (road) and continues to the turning circle at the far eastern end of the village.
See Lower Largo article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO4202 : The Serpentine Walk, Lower Largo by Bill Kasman
This information board is located at the southern end of the most easterly of the two access points to the Serpentine Walk which lie within the village of Lower Largo.
See Lower Largo article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO4202 : The Serpentine Walk, Lower Largo by Bill Kasman
Here, the Serpentine Walk crosses a bridge over the Largo Burn. A few metres further on the path splits into two. The main path heads north towards the A915 whilst another narrower path heads west (to the left) and joins the former route of the Fife Coast Railway near to the site of what was Lower Largo Railway Station.
See Lower Largo article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO4202 : Lower Largo Waste Water Treatment Works by Bill Kasman
Seen here from the western branch of the Serpentine Walk (visible on the right).
See Lower Largo article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO4202 : The Serpentine Walk, Lower Largo by Bill Kasman
Heading towards the A915.
See Lower Largo article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO4202 : Old tree by Bill Kasman
About midway along the Serpentine Walk, Lower Largo, I found this old tree which had been comprehensively butchered, presumably by the local authority for a good reason.
See Lower Largo article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO4202 : Serpentine Walk, Lower Largo by Bill Kasman
The path coming in from the left is the most westerly access point within the village to the Serpentine Walk. The path to the right is the line of the former Fife Coast Railway and is now part of the Fife Coastal Path.
See Lower Largo article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO4202 : The Serpentine Walk, Lower Largo by Bill Kasman
The Serpentine Walk enters Lower Largo at the most easterly of its two branches. The Fife Coastal Path crosses here following the route of the now-disused Fife Coast Railway. When the railway was in operation there was a pedestrian level crossing at this point.
See Lower Largo article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO4202 : The Serpentine Walk, Lower Largo by Bill Kasman
This bench seat, just off the Serpentine Walk, is situated in a position which offers good views over the Firth of Forth.
See Lower Largo article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO4202 : The Serpentine Walk, Lower Largo by Bill Kasman
This part of the Serpentine Walk hints at the Walk once having had a much better surface than it currently does.
See Lower Largo article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO4202 : The Serpentine Walk, Lower Largo by Bill Kasman
The Serpentine Walk crosses the Largo Burn by an almost unnoticeable bridge!
See Lower Largo article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO4202 : The Serpentine Walk, Lower Largo by Bill Kasman
The Serpentine Walk approaches a bridge over the Largo Burn. The bridge isn't at all obvious - the only sign is a short section of parapet to the left of the Walk.
See Lower Largo article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO4203 : Upper Largo by Bill Kasman
Seen from the Serpentine Walk. Largo Law (290m) is visible through the trees. The smaller hill is Lahill Craig (185m) which was once a popular practice crag for aspiring rock climbers but has been 'out of bounds' for many years now.
See Lower Largo article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO4202 : New Houses, Lower Largo by Bill Kasman
Seen from the Serpentine Walk this new housing development, just off the A915, is being built by Lundin Homes. The development will be known as Selkirk Grove.
See Lower Largo article Link
by Bill Kasman


KML

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