Page 2

Kennet Avon Canal Newbury to Devizes

( Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... )
Creative Commons Licence [Some Rights Reserved]   Text © Copyright January 2011, Maurice Pullin; licensed for re-use under a Creative Commons Licence.
Images also under a similar Creative Commons Licence.


Contents
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
SU4567

Guyers Lock No.84: Enborne Bridge No.35:

SU4567 2009 SU4567 : Canal east of Guyer's Lock by Graham Horn

SU4566 2010 SU4566 : Kennet and Avon Canal at Guyer's Lock by Nigel Cox
2010 SU4566 : Kennet and Avon Canal at Guyer's Lock by Nigel Cox
2009 SU4566 : Canal west of Guyer's Lock by Graham Horn

SU4366 2010 SU4366 : Benham Lock by Mike Todd
2010 SU4366 : Benham Bridge No 66 by Mike Todd
2010 SU4366 : The Kennet and Avon Canal, Enborne by Andrew Smith
2009 SU4366 : River Kennet by Graham Horn




2004
SU4567 : Enborne Bridge by Pierre Terre
View past bridge abutment of the old railway to Lambourn, to Enborne Bridge and the A34 flyover west of Newbury
by Pierre Terre


2011
SU4567 : Kennet and Avon Canal: Former Lambourn Valley Railway bridge by Nigel Cox
This is the point at which the former Lambourn Valley Railway crossed the Kennet and Avon Canal by means of an iron girder bridge. The railway was in operation, from Newbury to Lambourn, from 1898 to 1973. Only the bridge abutment, seen here, on the north side of the canal survives, all traces of the railway on the south side having been demolished with the construction of a large housing estate.
by Nigel Cox





1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
SU4566

Guyers Lock No.84: Enborne Bridge No.35:

2004
SU4566 : Enborne Bridge and Guyer's Lock by Pierre Terre
Looking through Enborne Bridge to Guyer's Lock
by Pierre Terre


2009
SU4566 : Guyer's Lock by Graham Horn
Lock 84, with a fall of 7 feet.
by Graham Horn


2010
SU4566 : Kennet and Avon Canal: Guyer's Lock by Nigel Cox
Taken from Enborne Bridge and nearly the same viewpoint as Graham's SU4566 : Guyer's Lock this view shows the lock under somewhat different and colder weather conditions.
by Nigel Cox





1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
SU4466

Newbury Bypass: Higg's Lock No.83:

2004
SU4466 : Newbury Bypass by Pierre Terre
The A34 crosses the Kennet & Avon Canal between Guyer's and Higg's locks, west of Newbury
by Pierre Terre


2009
SU4466 : Ten thousand trees by Graham Horn
The Newbury bypass bridge was awarded a Concrete Society award in 1999/2000. Someone has taken the opportunity to carve into the mortar "10 thousand trees" a reminder of the number of trees that were cut down to construct the bypass, and a reminder of the conflicts that took place at the events that became to be called the "third battle of Newbury". The context is here SU4466 : Newbury bypass bridge
by Graham Horn


2004
SU4466 : Higg's Lock and Newbury Bypass by Pierre Terre
Heading downstream through Higg's Lock towards the A34 Newbury Bypass
by Pierre Terre


Pickletimber Railway Bridge:

2009
SU4466 : Pickletimber railway bridge by Graham Horn
The railway follows a straighter line and makes one of its crossings of the canal here.
by Graham Horn


2009
SU4466 : Pickletimber railway bridge by Graham Horn
The standard railway bridge crossing the canal along this section, a steel structure on brick buttresses. Trains really rattle across.
by Graham Horn



2013 SU4466 : The Orange Way after Wiltshire (43) by Shazz2015 SU4466 : Railway Bridge by N Chadwick2013 SU4466 : Pillbox between railway and canal by Christine Johnstone




1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
SU4366


Benham Bridge No.37: Benham Lock No.82:


2004
SU4366 : Benham Bridge and Pillbox by Pierre Terre
The Kennet and Avon Canal was reputedly to have been used as a defensive line in the event of invasion in World War II. Here an old pillbox survives, backed by extensive wetland to the north.
by Pierre Terre


1976
SU4366 : Benham Lock, Kennet and Avon Canal, Berkshire by Dr Neil Clifton
Although Benham Lock was in working order in 1976 when this photograph was taken, there were very very few boats, as the Newbury section could not be reached either from the east or the west at that time.
by Dr Neil Clifton


2009
SU4366 : Benham Bridge from Benham Lock by Graham Horn
To the left can be seen an WWII pillbox, one of many built along the canal as a strategic line of defence. The bridge is a farm accommodation bridge. Locks are numbered from number 1 Hanham Lock near Bristol, to 106 County Lock in Reading.
by Graham Horn


1976
SU4366 : River Kennet flowing into Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr Neil Clifton
At this point, the River Kennet crosses the canal on the level. Here, the Kennet (opposite) is seen flowing into the canal: behind the photographer, it flows out again over a rudimentary weir below the towpath.
by Dr Neil Clifton


1976
SU4366 : River Kennet, Berkshire by Dr Neil Clifton
Although the Kennet and Avon Canal west of Newbury was never part of the Kennet Navigation, but was built separately, the flirtation between canal and river continues for many miles, and near here, the River Kennet crosses the canal on the level, the river flowing in on the south side of the canal and out again, over a rudimentary weir, on the north side. Here the river is seen just beyond this overflow. The railway bridge in the distance carries the ex-GWR main line.
by Dr Neil Clifton


2009
SU4366 : Railway from Benham Lock by Graham Horn
This shows how close the railway is to the canal at many places along the Kennet valley. A London to West Country train whistles past.
by Graham Horn


2009
SU4366 : Benham Lock by Graham Horn
Lock 82, with a fall of 6 feet 3 inches.
by Graham Horn


2009
SU4366 : Salmon ladder on the canal by Graham Horn
Part of a project to encourage salmon up to the upper reaches of the River Kennet. This is a ladder from the river into the canal. The equivalent weir is a few metres further east. The salmon can continue upstream via the Hamstead Mill stream.
by Graham Horn






KML

( Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... )
You are not logged in login | register