Page 4

Kennet Avon Canal Newbury to Devizes

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Creative Commons Licence [Some Rights Reserved]   Text © Copyright January 2011, Maurice Pullin; licensed for re-use under a Creative Commons Licence.
Images also under a similar Creative Commons Licence.


Contents
SU4067
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright


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Dreweat's Lock No.79: Irish Hill:


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SU4067 2009 SU4067 : Pillbox alongside the canal by Graham Horn! 2010 SU4067 : Kennet & Avon canal below Irish Hill on the right by D Gore

SU4067 2010 SU4067 : The Kennet and Avon Canal, Hamstead Marshall by Andrew Smith



SU3967 2009 SU3967 : Pasture south of the canal by Graham Horn| 1976 SU3967 : Shepherd Bridge, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr Neil Clifton| 2004 SU3967 : Shepherd's Bridge by Pierre Terre

SU3967 2009 SU3967 : Through Shepherd's Bridge by Graham Horn! 2009 SU3967 : Approaching Shepherd's Bridge by Graham Horn| 2010 SU3967 : Kennet & Avon canal looking west from Shepherd's Bridge by D Gore

SU3967 2009 SU3967 : East of Kintbury by Graham Horn| 2010 SU3967 : Shaded stretch of the Kennet & Avon canal by D Gore! 2009 SU3967 : East of Kintbury by Graham Horn

SU3967 2010 SU3967 : The River Kennet  and the Kennet and Avon canal, east of Kintbury by Brian Robert Marshall| 2010 SU3967 : Fishermen in focus on the Kennet & Avon canal by D Gore

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2009
SU4067 : Canal weir by Graham Horn
This section of the canal follows the River Kennet closely, with streams from the river flowing into and out of the canal at regular intervals. Here a regulating weir lets excess water out of the canal back into the river, just before arriving at Dreweat's Lock. The square boundary is at the end of this walkway, the lock being in SU4167
by Graham Horn



2009
SU4067 : Canal weir by Graham Horn
Just west of Dreweat's Lock, a canalised section of the River Kennet has a weir to regulate the water. These are the weir paddles, lifted manually by a spike. These open gates under the towpath for excess water to flow through. Most of the paddles are down in dry conditions.
by Graham Horn



2009
SU4067 : Canal east of Kintbury by Graham Horn
The canal and its towpath are separated along this section by profuse growth of reeds and bullrushes, such that it is often difficult to see the water when walking the towpath. In the south side there are cattle pastures.
by Graham Horn



2009
SU4067 : Approaching Dreweat's Lock by Graham Horn
This British Waterways workboat, with a grab and dredger attachment, has the unimaginative name of Kennet 1. The lock is in SU4167
by Graham Horn




SU3967
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright

Shepherd's Bridge No.40:



2010
SU3967 : Kennet and Avon canal and the River Kennet, east of Kintbury by Brian Robert Marshall
The river is on the right, the canal on the left. The canal is at a higher level than the river.
by Brian Robert Marshall





SU3867
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright

Kintbury Bridge No.41: Kintbury Lock No.78: Vicarage Bridge No.42:



2010
SU3867 : Weir, River Kennet and Kennet and Avon canal, Kintbury by Brian Robert Marshall
To a non-expert like me it appears that the canal is draining some of its contents into the river via this weir. There must be a reason for it.

Update Jan 2011: I have just heard from a fellow contributor as follows:

'The weir is necessary to prevent the lock cut from flooding and
overflowing the towpath in times of high water levels. This can cause a breach
in the canal section. It also keeps the water level up to the navigation depth
at other times.'

Thanks Maurice.
by Brian Robert Marshall




1976
SU3867 : Looking towards Kintbury, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr Neil Clifton
Kintbury bridge and Lock No 78 are ahead as we approach Kintbury from the east. Kintbury is a most attractive village with almost all services available, including that ever-necessary establishment for boatman and walker, a good public house.
by Dr Neil Clifton




2009
SU3867 : WB Kennet Valley by Graham Horn
This is Kennet Valley, the horsedrawn trip boat operated from below the lock at Kintbury. The trip has just finished and passengers disembarking. The horse is off to the left. Kennet Valley is designated as a wide boat, in that it has the same sort of lines as a narrowboat but is wider than 7 feet, I think about 12 feet in this case.
by Graham Horn




2009
SU3867 : Dundas Arms, Kintbury by Graham Horn
This is a typical canal side pub, once serving the needs of the working boatmen, now upmarket and able to charge high prices because of its location. The old stables are to the right. It is named after Charles Dundas, the first Chairman of the Kennet and Avon Canal Company from 1788, and MP for Berkshire from 1794 to 1832.
by Graham Horn




2009
SU3867 : WB Kennet Valley by Graham Horn
Looking east into the bright sun. The horse drawn wide boat Kennet Valley has just finished its trip and the crew are packing up. The horse is doing what any good horse would do having just pulled a 20 ton boat for a few miles - eating.
by Graham Horn




2009
SU3867 : Kintbury water point by Graham Horn
Water points occur along canals at convenient places every 10 miles or so. This one above Kintbury Lock has been nicely painted to highlight the words and symbols, which are embossed on the metalwork.
by Graham Horn




2002
SU3867 : Vicarage Bridge - No.42 - K&A Canal, Kintbury - 2002 by Maurice Pullin
The railway to Newbury, Reading and St.Pancras is just a few yards to the right and is well used.
The footpath to the left over the bridge is a useful if steep short cut to the Kintbury shopping centre.
The vicarage is also to the left and is shown on SU3867 : Old Vicarage at Kintbury
by Maurice Pullin




2009-SU3867 : Canal east of Kintbury by Graham Horn| 1976-SU3867 : Kintbury Bridge and Lock No 78, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr Neil Clifton| 2009-SU3867 : Kintbury Lock by Graham Horn| 2009-SU3867 : Narrowboats at Kintbury by Graham Horn
2009-SU3867 : Approaching Kintbury by Graham Horn




SU3767
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright


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Orchard Meadow Bridge No.43: Brunsden Lock Bridge No.44: Brunsden Lock No.77:


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SU3767 2009 SU3767 : Canal west of Kintbury by Graham Horn
SU3668 2008 SU3668 : Kennet and Avon Canal east of Hungerford 8 by Jonathan Billinger
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2009
Lock 77, and with a rise of only 4 feet 11 inches one of the shallowest on the canal.
by Graham Horn

2009
Lock 77 with a fall of 4 feet 11 inches. The pile is weed that has been hauled out from around the gates and the paddles. I hope no one comes and puts it back in again.
by Graham Horn

2009
An accommodation bridge at the tail of Brunsden Lock. For a similar earlier picture see SU3767 : Brunsden Bridge and Lock No 77, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr. Neil Clifton.
by Graham Horn

2009
The west face of the bridge. For the east side see SU3767 : Orchard Meadow Bridge, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr. Neil Clifton. The narrowboat is tucked into the bank. It appears to be aground, which is not uncommon when mooring away from designated moorings, although one is allowed to moor virtually anywhere on the towpath side.
by Graham Horn

1976
It is a mystery to me why such a substantial bridge as this was provided here, for this is only an accommodation bridge of purely local importance.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
I am standing on the bridge looking east towards Kintbury. This photo of the bridge SU3767 : Orchard Meadow Bridge, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr. Neil Clifton, was taken from somewhere between the two boats on the towpath side.
by Graham Horn

2009
A narrowboat passes a residential wideboat built to a Dutch barge style.
by Graham Horn

1976
Canoeing has for many years been popular on the Kennet and Avon, and served to remind the public of the existence of the waterway even when it was unnavigable by powered craft
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
This is the north-west parapet of the bridge, looking north. The railway line is close here. Also seen is a WWII pill box. These are found along all of the Kennet and Avon Canal as it was designated as a strategic line of defence, so every bridge and other possible crossing point used to have at least one and most remain.
by Graham Horn


SU3667
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright

Railway Bridge No.45:


2010
On the Kennet & Avon Canal, the lights on the top suggest that this boat is also used for night-time trips.
by Paul Gillett
Shared Description

1967
The canal, of course, was here first, but for its whole length it was later joined by the almost-parallel Great Western Railway, which occupied a position mainly to the north of the canal, except for a few miles near Newbury. Here the railway again swings to the south, remaining on that side for the next few miles until west of Hungerford.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
This is the unimaginative name of the bridge taking the railway across the canal. For an earlier picture from nearly the same location see SU3667 : Skew railway bridge, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr. Neil Clifton.
by Graham Horn

2009
This is the unimaginative name given to this bridge over the Kennet and Avon Canal, taking the railway from the north to the south side. It took advantage of a slight bend in the canal to make the crossing, which is nevertheless still at an acute angle.
by Graham Horn

2009
This bridge has the unimaginative name of Railway Bridge. The railway follows the canal closely between Pewsey and Reading, crossing it many times. Wagons of a Foster Yeoman stone train can be seen passing over the bridge, on their way from the Mendip quarries to Acton.
by Graham Horn

SU3668
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright

Wire Lock Bridge No.45: Wire Lock No.76:


2008
The Rose of Hungerford, a trip boat owned by the Kennet and Avon Canal Trust, turns in the winding hole to the east of Wire Lock.
by Miss Steel

2009
This is a winding hole on the canal, a place where boats longer than the width of the canal can be turned. It is pronounced "winding" as in the wind that blows, as unpowered boats would have used a favourable wind to assist their turn.
The railway, the Berks and Hants line, closely follows the canal from Pewsey to Reading. Here a Foster Yeoman stone train is passing, on a turn from the Mendip quarries to Acton. It is hauled by a class 59 locomotive, one of eight shared by ARC and Foster Yeoman who operate the quarries.
by Graham Horn

1976
The railway is to the south of the canal here. The A4 is a few hundred yards to the north, but is separated from the canal by the River Kennet, and there is no access.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2008
Wire Lock and bridge looking from the east.
by Jonathan Billinger

2010
The power of the water being lowered to allow the lock to open
Wire Lock was built between 1794 and 1804 under the supervision of the engineer John Rennie. The canal is administered by British Waterways, It is a grade II listed building
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wire_Lock
by Paul Gillett
Shared Description

2010
The Kennet and Avon is made up of two river navigations and a linking stretch of canal. It runs from Hanham Lock near Bristol to the River Thames at Reading, over 100 miles long with more than 100 locks, some magnificent engineering and crossing some of the most beautiful scenery in southern England. It was only reopened in 1990 after decades of dereliction. by Oast House Archive

2009
Lock 76, with a rise of 6 feet 10 inches. The boat is being used by canal trip boat Rose of Hungerford. She was built especially as a trip boat and is 55 feet long and 10 feet 6 inches wide, thus only filling about three quarters of the 72 feet by 14 feet lock. She takes 50 passengers.
by Graham Horn

2009
The lock gates are closed and the water is about to be let out of the lock.
by Miss Steel

2008
Bridge at Wire Lock, looking east.
by Jonathan Billinger

2009
Lock 76, with a fall of 6 feet 10 inches. This lovely isolated lock is regularly used by the canal trip boat the Rose of Hungerford.
by Graham Horn

2008
Wire Lock from the west in the pouring rain.
by Jonathan Billinger

2010
Looking West just after Wire Lock, a cyclist can be seen on the path alongside the canal
by Paul Gillett
Shared Description

2008-SU3668 : Kennet and Avon Canal east of Hungerford 8 by Jonathan Billinger 2010-SU3668 : Kennet & Avon Canal by Paul Gillett2009-SU3668 : Wire Lock Bridge by Graham Horn
2009-SU3668 : Wire Lock, Kennet and Avon Canal by Miss Steel| 2010-SU3668 : Wire Lock by Paul Gillett| 2003-SU3668 : Wire Lock - No.76 - Kennet & Avon Canal - 2003 by Maurice Pullin
2008-SU3668 : Kennet and Avon Canal east of Hungerford 6 by Jonathan Billinger| 2008-SU3668 : Kennet and Avon Canal east of Hungerford 3 by Jonathan Billinger| 2010-SU3668 : Kennet & Avon Canal by Paul Gillett
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SU3568
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
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Dunmill Lock Bridge No.46: Dunmill Lock No.75:

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SU3568 2009 SU3568 : Dun fishing by Graham Horn| 2009 SU3568 : Canal east of Dun Mill by Graham Horn
SU3568 2009 SU3568 : Dun Mill Lock by Graham Horn| 2010-SU3568 : Dun Mill Lock by Paul Gillett
SU3568 2010 SU3568 : Hungerford - Dunmill Lock by Chris Talbot
SU3568 2008-SU3568 : Dun Mill lock on the Kennet and Avon canal by Roger Davies
SU3568 2010 SU3568 : Hungerford - Narrowboat by Chris Talbot
SU3568 2009-SU3568 : Approaching Dun Mill Lock by Graham Horn
SU3568 2008 SU3568 : Kennet and Avon Canal east of Hungerford 2 by Jonathan Billinger
SU3568 2010 SU3568 : Looking West from near Dun Mill Lock by Paul Gillett
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2010
A spring-time view along the canal with Dunmill Bridge visible in the distance.
by Andrew Smith

2009
The canal had about half an inch of ice on it here, on the open section below Dun Mill lock with the River Kennet off to the right. The ice made for an interesting (read difficult) turn for the trip boat at the winding hole, 300 metres east of here. The passengers did not mind or notice - Santa was on board.
by Graham Horn

2009
This is the easterly extent of Portdown or Hungerford Common, which includes the section between the canal and the river from here to Dun Mill. The Common is still owned by the town of Hungerford. In the distance is Dun Mill Lock bridge.
by Graham Horn

2009
On the left is the River Kennet. On the right, a few feet higher, is the Kennet and Avon Canal. The canal follows the Dun valley from Crofton to near here where the River Dun joins the River Kennet. At times the River Kennet is higher than the canal (not here) and various weirs allow the canal to be fed by the river and to get rid of any excess. Here the towpath runs between the two.
by Graham Horn

2008
Entering Dun Mill Lock from the east.
by Jonathan Billinger

2010
Dunmill lock on the Kennet and Avon Canal.
by Chris Talbot

1976
For the westward-travelling boatman, this is the last lock before Hungerford on this very pleasant stretch of canal.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
Looking into the lock from the Rose of Hungerford.
by Miss Steel

It should be noted here that Graham Horn is one of the skippers on "Rose of Hungerford"
2009
We had to de-ice the boat before we could safely use it. We have Santa on board having met him at the lock, and with a sprinkling of snow the children (aged 8 months to 80 years), were enjoying themselves. I was outside on the helm, getting cold but enjoying ice-breaking.
by Graham Horn

It should also be noted that ice breaking with a narrowboat, especially a 70 footer with passengers, is a task requiring far more skill than is apparent to a casual bystander. MEP

2010
Dun Mill Lock was built between 1794 and 1804 under the supervision of the engineer John Rennie. The canal is administered by British Waterways. The lock has a rise/fall of 5 ft 8 in (1.73 m). It is a grade II listed building
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dun_Mill_Lock
by Paul Gillett

2010

2009
A very cold and frosty Sunday before Christmas, with a sprinkling of snow, a covering of ice on the canal that we had to break, and we needed to be very careful around the lock. We were on Rose of Hungerford trip boat and had just picked up Santa Claus.
by Graham Horn


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SU3468
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
====================================================

Station Road Bridge No.48:

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SU3468 2009 SU3468 : Canal east of Hungerford by Graham Horn
SU3468 2009 SU3468 : Canal east of Hungerford by Graham Horn
SU3468 2010 SU3468 : Hungerford - Kennet And Avon Canal by Chris Talbot
SU3468 2008 SU3468 : Hungerford - Kennet And Avon Canal by Chris Talbot
SU3468 2008 SU3468 : Sanitary Station bridge by Graham Horn
SU3468 2009SU3468 : West along the Kennet and Avon canal, Hungerford by Mandy Barry-Cades
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2008
A passing narrowboat and dog-walkers on the towpath.
by Jonathan Billinger

2008
Approaching Hungerford from the east - helmsman's view.
by Jonathan Billinger

2008
Part of the towpath alongside the Kennet And Avon Canal.
by Chris Talbot

2009
The viewpoint is a footbridge over the canal that eventually terminates in the High Street behind the viewpoint.
by Mandy Barry-Cades

1976
The towpath is on the south side here, having changed sides at Dunmill Bridge, so this again is a westward-facing photograph, with Hungerford Station just out of picture to the left. The attractive small building on the right is a sewage pumping station.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
A pedestrian bridge over the Kennet and Avon Canal. It is popularly know as sanitary station bridge because the brick building to right is a boat facilities point, for filling with drinking water, emptying toilets and disposing of rubbish. They can be found on all canals, at convenient places at about 10 mile intervals.
by Graham Horn

2010
The fallen tree appeared to block the route but deft manoeuvres by the crew managed to get it out of the way, on the return a man had turned up with a chain saw to cut the tree away.

2009
Taggers get everywhere these days.
by Mandy Barry-Cades

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SU3368
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
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Hungerford Town Bridge No.49: Hungerford Wharf: Hungerford Lock No.74: Hungerford Church Swing Bridge No.50:

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SU3368 2010 SU3368 : Kennet & Avon Canal at Hungerford by Paul Gillett! 2010 SU3368 : Kennet and Avon Canal by don cload
SU3368 2010 SU3368 : Cottage beside Kennet & Avon Canal by Paul Gillett! 2004 SU3368 : Kennet & Avon Canal, Hungerford Wharf by Dr Neil Clifton
SU3368 2010 SU3368 : Kennet & Avon Canal at Hungerford by Chris Cursley! 2010 SU3368 : Hungerford - Kennet And Avon Canal by Chris Talbot
SU3368 2008 SU3368 : Hungerford - Kennet And Avon Canal by Chris Talbot! 2008 SU3368 : Hungerford - Swing Bridge by Chris Talbot
SU3368 2006 SU3368 : Stormy canal by Des Blenkinsopp| 2010 SU3368 : Hungerford - Towpath by Chris Talbot
SU3368 2008 SU3368 : Fishing on the Kennet and Avon Canal by Graham Horn
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2008
Taken looking east from Hungerford town bridge, with the canal and its towpath running past the impressive Bridge House. The pink valerian flowers made a nice foreground. They were growing out of the brick parapets of the bridge.
by Graham Horn

2010
Looking East on the Kennet & Avon Canal
by Paul Gillett
Shared Description

2005
With the 'Rose of Hungerford' in the foreground waiting to start a trip.</td></tr><tr><td></td></tr><tr><td>'We sail the ocean blue and our saucy ship's a beauty.'</td></tr><tr><td></td></tr><tr><td>One of our members and a major contributor to Geograph, Graham Horn is one of the skippers of this vessel. He could be there. </td></tr><tr><td>MEP

2007
A view looking to the west from the Town Bridge towards Hungerford Wharf.
by Phil Williams

2008
Looking south across to a town house which pre-dates the canal.
by Jonathan Billinger

1976
In 1976, after walking along the K&A towpath all the way from Reading, it was pleasant to actually see some boats, albeit they were of the type that the seasoned narrow boat enthusiast would refer to scathingly as 'Noddy boats'
by Dr Neil Clifton

2010
Hungerford Lock on the Kennet And Avon Canal.
by Chris Talbot

2010
Looking down from the bottom gates at Hungerford Lock and the Kennet and Avon Canal, towards the main bridge in the centre of town
by Mike Todd

2008
This is the top pair of gates on Hungerford Lock, number 74. Despite all paddles being closed, they are still leaking well. Lock gates are generally replaced every 25-40 years and these are nowhere near life-expired.
by Graham Horn

1976
The square-towered Hungerford Church is just out of picture to the left, in this westward looking photograph from 1976
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
The canal to the west of Hungerford. St. Laurence's church is adjacent to a very-hard-to-push swing bridge over the canal.
by Graham Horn

2008
This is the swing bridge on the Kennet and Avon Canal adjacent to the church, hence the name. It is one of many such pedestrian bridges along the Berkshire section of the canal, most of which are still human powered (you push it open). Although the towpath remains on the south side here, this carries a popular footpath from the town onto Freeman's Marsh, which was bisected when the canal was built in 1795.
by Graham Horn

2009
This bridge gives pedestrian access through the churchyard to Hungerford Marsh. It is heavily used, as can be seen! When operating it for boats, it is one of the most difficult bridges to swing because it has dropped on its pivot over the years and will often stick on its mountings.
by Graham Horn


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SU3268
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
=================================================

Hungerford Marsh Swing Bridge No.51: Hungerford Marsh Lock 72: Cobbler's Lock Footbridge No.52: Cobbler's Lock No.72:

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SU3268 2010 SU3268 : Hungerford - Kennet And Avon Canal by Chris Talbot
SU3268 2010 SU3268 : Hungerford - Kennet And Avon Canal by Chris Talbot
SU3268 2010 SU3268 : Broad and Narrow by Des Blenkinsopp
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1976
West of Hungerford, the Kennet and Avon begins to rise more steeply, with locks coming at frequent intervals towards the summit at Great Bedwyn.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2008
The Kennet and Avon Canal crosses Freeman's Marsh to the west of Hungerford. It bisected the marsh when built in 1795. To the north, right, the marsh is a rural water meadow, through which the River Dun flows, and classified as a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). The area to the south, left, is open grass land. The marsh is common land owned by the Manor and Town of Hungerford (these days a registered charity).
by Graham Horn

2010
Lock 73 on Kennet and Avon - known as Hungerford Marsh Lock
by Mike Todd

2006
Looking east from Marsh Lock. Freeman's Marsh, on either side, is grazed by cattle. A swing bridge at the lock allows passage (including bovine) across. despite appearances the town's church is to the south of the canal.
by Andrew Smith

1976
The water above the lock appears quite choppy in this March 1976 picture, with a typical K&A swing bridge across the lock.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2008
This is an unusual but logical arrangement where the swingbridge goes over the lock, thus saving the boatmen from stopping twice. Just remember to open the swingbridge before you fill the lock. It is necessary because a number of footpaths converge here, from various parts of the surrounding common land, Freeman's Marsh.
The 1:50K map struggles to show the location clearly, presumably because they need to keep the lock and bridge symbols separate. The 1:25K is better.
by Graham Horn

2008
The OS 1:50K map shows it wrong; the swing bridge across the canal sits exactly on top of the lock. Thus lock users have to open the swing bridge before allowing a boat to rise in the lock. It is the meeting point of several footpaths across the marsh and therefore a very popular spot, as can be seen by the hordes of people in my picture.
by Graham Horn

2008
This lock is in the middle of Freeman's Marsh (common land) with a swing bridge over the lock. The stop post for the swing bridge can be seen in the grass.
by Graham Horn

2008
Although Freeman's Marsh is open access land, there are a number of defined footpaths, which are generally easier to follow. They all converge on the swing bridge over the canal at Marsh Lock, hence the proliferation of signs. Also seen is an old three-ton weight limit sign.
by Graham Horn

It is the weight limit that is three tons not the sign.
2008
This lock is at the western end of Freeman's Marsh, an area of common land owned by the Town and Manor of Hungerford. I have not been able to find out the origin of the name of the lock. The lock cottage and this house are the only two houses on the marsh.
by Graham Horn

1976
View looking westwards as the canal climbs towards its summit level at Great Bedwyn.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2008
Lock 72 on the Kennet and Avon Canal. All the books are remarkably quiet about how this lock got its name, but it certainly used not to have the snigger value that mentioning its name provokes today. The lock cottage is now a private residence and the lock is to be left empty because otherwise their cellar has a flooding problem.
by Graham Horn

1976
As far west as Hungerford, the K&A follows the valley of the River Kennet, but at the latter town forsakes this valley for that of a tributary of the Kennet, the River Dun. In fact the canal crosses over the River Dun by an aqueduct just where the photographer is standing.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2008
Cruising along the Kennet and Avon Canal, most people miss this shy three-arched aqueduct. The canal crosses the river, just above Cobbler's Lock. It is worth a detour to see how it is the simple structures such as this that were needed to create a working canal.
by Graham Horn

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SU3168
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
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Barrackfield Swing Bridge: Railway Bridge No.54: Picketfield Lock No.71:

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SU3168 2005 SU3168 : Train crossing the Kennet and Avon canal by Martyn Pattison
SU3168 2004 SU3168 : Below Picketfield Lock No 71, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr Neil Clifton
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1976
The remains of this bridge are seen here almost 35 years ago, long before the canal was made navigable at this point.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
This footbridge, between Cobblers and Picketfield locks, is not named. It is, however, adjacent to the site of the former Barrackfield swing bridge, so Barrackfield footbridge would seem appropriate. The towpath stays on the south side of the canal, but the bridge takes a foot path over towards the A4 which is just 200 metres north of here. It replaces the much earlier swing bridge and the narrows for that can just be seen. Behind the railway bridge can be seen. There are plans for a marina to be built on the land to the right. It has planning permission but nothing is happening, perhaps until the economic climate is right.
by Graham Horn

1976
Picketfield Lock, as seen here from the east in 1976, had been restored but was not then in use as it was inaccessible to boats from both directions.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2004
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SU3067
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
=================================================

Froxfield Bridge No.55: Froxfield Bottom Lock No.70: Froxfield Middle Lock No.69:

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SU3067 2009 SU3067 : Kennet and Avon Canal by Graham Horn
SU3067 2007 SU3067 : The Kennet and Avon Canal, Froxfield by Andrew Smith
SU3067 2007 SU3067 : The Kennet and Avon Canal, Froxfield by Andrew Smith
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1976
This circular weir, or 'waste pit' (as known in water engineering circles) takes surplus water from the canal and returns it to the River Dun. The railway line is seen close behind.
by Dr Neil Clifton

1976
This solidly-built brick bridge carries a minor road of local importance. Viewed here from the west.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
The bridge is the county boundary between Wiltshire (here) and Berkshire(beyond). It is a regular turning point for charter boat trips operated by the Rose of Hungerford from Hungerford wharf.
by Graham Horn

2009
This stream originally flowed into the River Dun but was intercepted when the canal was built to provide water. It enters a funnel which provides a filter to prevent too much debris entering the canal but it is still pretty shallow on that bank. Behind is the Reading to West Country railway, the Berks and Hants line (it this section does not go through Hampshire).
by Graham Horn

2007
Looking along to Froxfield Bottom Lock the most easterly of Froxfield's three locks.
by Andrew Smith

1976
Seen from the east as in 1976, restored but not yet in use.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
For eastbound travellers on the canal this will have been the 16th lock in quick succession that they have had to negotiate since the summit at Crofton top lock SU2462. They are more spaced out from here. In the background is Froxfield Bridge, the county boundary between Wiltshire and Berkshire.
by Graham Horn

2002
The Kennet and Avon Canal and the train to Bedwyn share the Kennet Valley
by Rog Frost

2004
1976
The restoration gang was busy at this lock when photographed in March 1976. There is not always agreement about the name of this lock for the following reason: there were three Froxfield locks, and this one being the middle one, was appropriately named. However, Froxfield Top Lock has often been called Oakhill Down Lock. As this left only two Froxfield locks, the name Froxfield Upper Lock has been used by some writers to describe the Middle lock. To avoid any confusion, the older name is to be preferred
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
Looking eastwards as the boat rises in the lock. This one has a fairly standard rise of 6 feet 11 inches, but it often seems more if you are standing at the back of the boat as the lock is filling, and you wonder if those lock gates will hold the pressure of 60,000 gallons of water. Note here that the bottom paddles are different. The one on the right is the traditional ratchet and pinion gear. The one on the left is a modern hydraulic mechanism, granny gear as it is derogatorily known.
by Graham Horn

2009
As a steerer one gets a close view of the plants growing from the lock walls as one enters a lock.
by Graham Horn

2009
For some reason you always seem to pass boats on this pound. Fortunately it is slightly wider, and there is a winding hole (a place where boats longer than the width of the canal can turn, originally using the wind, where favourable, to assist them).
by Graham Horn

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SU2967
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
===============================================================

Oakhill Down Bridge No.56: Oakhill Down Lock No.68:

================================================================
1976
The former name of this lock was Froxfield Top Lock. At the time of this 1976 photograph, this lock was derelict and awaiting restoration. Oakhill Down Bridge is seen in the background, which is an accommodation bridge only.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
This is the westbound approach. Having just come through Froxfield Bottom Lock and Froxfield Middle Lock you'd think this one would be ...? Er, no. It is Oakhill Down Lock.
by Graham Horn

2003
This shot from a different angle shows the lock restored and in use 27 years after Dr. Clifton's photo.
by Maurice Pullin

2009
Originally Froxfield Top Lock, the top one of three. The road runs very close to the right here and is a popular spot for people to come and eat their lunch and watch the boats go by (gongoozling). The railway runs equally close to the left.
Compare this photo to this one before restoration by Dr. Neil Clifton SU2967 : Oak Hill Down Lock No 68, Kennet and Avon Canal and this one six years earlier than mine by Maurice Pullin SU2967 : Oakhill Down Lock - No.68 - Kennet & Avon Canal - 2003
by Graham Horn

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SU2966
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
====================================================

Fore Bridge No.57: Little Bedwin Footbridge: Little Bedwin Lock No.67:

====================================================
1976
Fore Bridge, about half a mile east of Little Bedwyn, gives access to a couple of cottages, but otherwise carries only a bridleway. There is the customary notice warning that it is not suitable for unusually heavy loads.
by Dr Neil Clifton

1976
Photographed from the west in 1976, when this part of the canal was still unnavigable.
by Dr Neil Clifton

1996
Looking south west towards Little Bedwyn. Behind the camera the canal runs through locks near Froxfield and so to Hungerford
by Martin Bodman

2009
This is a farm accommodation bridge. The road is classified as a byway, although you have to cross the railway to the left on the level. This house is squeezed between the canal and a minor road, but has always been an attractive and well-looked-after property.
by Graham Horn

2009
The bridge is concrete with an art deco appearance. If asked to date it I'd say it was from the 1930s
by Brian Robert Marshall

2009
A narrow boat passes through lock 67.
by Chris Talbot

2009-SU2966 : Little Bedwyn - Lock 67 by Chris Talbot
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SU2965
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
==========================================================================================

Little Bedwin Lock No.67: Little Bedwin Bridge No.58:

=========================================================================================
1999
The Kennet & Avon Canal at Little Bedwyn, with Little Bedwyn Lock behind. The Berks & Hant main line is just behind the hedge to the left, hence the footbridge in the distance.
by David Stowell

1976
These two footbridges between them span the canal and the parallel Great Western Railway. The road bridge at Little Bedwyn can be seen beyond.
by Dr Neil Clifton

1976
Looking westwards in 1976, this shows the derelict Little Bedwyn Lock. One of its bottom gates hangs drunkenly open, while the water in the pound above is contained by the top gates. The road bridge at Little Bedwyn, which carries an important minor road, can be seen behind.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
Little Bedwyn is one of the classic places on the canal for photographs, showing some combination of the railway, the canal, the church, the lock and the footbridge. It also happens to be on the border of two grid squares. I was waiting for a train to come as we worked the lock, but as you can see from the wash our boat is leaving and I'm meant to be on board.
by Graham Horn

2009
This bridge carries the road over the railway the River Dun and the Kennett and Avon Canal.
by Chris Talbot

1999-SU2965 : Little Bedwyn by David Stowell| 2009-SU2965 : Kennet and Avon canal, Little Bedwyn by Brian Robert Marshall| 2005-SU2965 : Canal lock, Railway and road by Mark Chambers| 2008-SU2965 : Little Bedwyn Lock by Geoff Harris
2004-SU2965 : Below Little Bedwyn Lock No 67, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr Neil Clifton| 2004-SU2965 : Kennet & Avon Navigation:  Little Bedwyn Lock No 66 by Dr Neil Clifton| 2010-SU2965 : Boat leaving Little Bedwyn Lock by David Martin|2009 SU2965 : The Kennet and Avon canal, Little Bedwyn by Brian Robert Marshall
========================================================================================
SU2865
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
========================================================================================

Potter's Lock No.66:

=========================================================================================
1976
Potters Lock, about half a mile west of Little Bedwyn, continues the ascent to the summit on this length of the canal, which was unnavigable in 1976 at the time of this photograph.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2010
Lock number 66 on the Kennet and Avon Canal
by David Martin

2009
A boat heading uphill enters Potters Lock number 66. There is a slight gap between the railway and the canal here, separated by some rough grazing.
by Graham Horn

2003
"Pairing up" makes these broad locks easier to work and saves water, an important consideration as much of the canal water used in locking at higher levels is back pumped at some expense.
by Maurice Pullin

1976
This gearing allows an underground paddle to be drawn to let off surplus canal water into the nearby River Dun. AS far as I know it was not operable at the time of the photograph.
by Dr Neil Clifton

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SU2864
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
======================================================

Burnt Mill Footbridge No.59: Burnt Mill Lock No.65: Bedwyn Wharf Bridge No.60:

======================================================
1976
The then derelict Burnt Mill Lock, about half a mile short of Great Bedwyn, as seen in 1976. A useful footbridge crosses the tail of the lock.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
This is the last lock before Great Bedwyn if heading uphill (west) along the canal. The village is a popular stopping point for provisions, and overnight stays (it has two pubs) but can be rather noisy from the adjacent railway line.
There is a similar view here SU2864 : Burnt Mill Lock - No.65 - Great Bedwyn - 2004 taken five years earlier.
by Graham Horn

2004
Burnt Mill Lock after restoration.
Great Bedwyn church can be seen in the distance.
by Maurice Pullin

2009
Looking north-east from the bridge at Great Bedwyn. On the right is the Kennet and Avon Canal. There are both short and long term moorings here. In the centre is the River Dun, a tributary of the River Kennet. The canal, when built in 1794 onwards, followed this river valley from Hungerford all the way to its summit at Crofton. On the left is the railway. The Great Western Railway built this route up the same valley in 1862. Today Great Bedwyn is the terminus of the local service from Reading and is occasionally served by fast trains to and from the West Country.
by Graham Horn

2007
The nearest access from Great Bedwyn to the Kennet and Avon is by way of this bridge. A public car park adjoins, and Great Bedwyn station, with a service from Paddington even on Sundays, is very close. There are also two convenient public houses on Great Bedwyn.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
After this section of canal was opened, about 1796, there was a large wharf here, serving Bedwyn and the surrounding agricultural land. The canal was the M4 of its day.
Today it is still a thriving place. There are moorings and boat engineering and repair facilities. It is also the home of the boats of The Bruce Trust, a charity that provides canal holidays for disabled people. Two of their wide-beam boats are seen here, Hannah and (probably) Rebecca. The boats all have wheelchair lifts for access and full wheelchair circulating space inside. Their website is here LinkExternal link
by Graham Horn

2009-SU2864 : Burnt Mill Lock by Graham Horn| 2007-SU2864 : Kennet Canal at Great Bedwyn by Kurt C| 2008-SU2864 : Kennet & Avon canal from Station Bridge, Great Bedwyn by Roger Davies| 2009-SU2864 : Great Bedwyn - Narrowboat by Chris Talbot
2009-SU2864 : Great Bedwyn - Maggie May by Chris Talbot| 1976-SU2864 : Bedwyn Wharf Bridge, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr Neil Clifton| 2009-SU2864 : Great Bedwyn - Canal Bridge by Chris Talbot| 2010-SU2864 : Bedwyn Wharf Bridge by David Martin
2009-SU2864 : Great Bedwyn - Hannahh by Chris Talbot
=====================================================================
SU2764
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
=====================================================================

Bedwyn Church Bridge No.61: Bedwyn Church Lock No.64:

======================================================================
1976
This section of canal was still unnavigable at the time of this 1976 photograph. The bridge is not suitable for heavy traffic.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2007
2009
Some of the names of the bridges and locks on the canal are easy to remember. The boat is about to pass under Bedwyn Church Bridge (pedestrian access only) and into Bedwyn Church Lock. Beyond the railway can be seen Bedwyn Church.
by Graham Horn

2009
This bridge carries a small footbridge over the Kennet and Avon Canal, the cast iron diamond shaped sign warns car drivers not to use this bridge.
by Chris Talbot

2007
A view looking NE down through the canal lock, which serves many passing narrowboats each day along this popular stretch of the Kennet.
by Kurt C

2007
The bridge carries a footpath giving convenient access to the church and the south end of this pleasant village.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2005 SU2764 : Reflection in canal by Chris Downer| 2010 SU2764 : Bedwyn Church Bridge by David Martin
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SU2763
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
====================================================

Mill Bridge No.62: Beech Tree Walk Bridge No.98: Beech Grove Lock No.63: New Bridge No.99:

====================================================
1976
Mill Bridge carries an important minor road linking Great Bedwyn with Wilton and East Grafton.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
It looks fragile, but this is a road bridge, carrying a country lane into Great Bedwyn.
by Graham Horn

2009
Imagine if you will boatloads of Nazi forces proceeding along the canal in 1940 when Britain stood alone against the rampaging Axis armies making free with Europe. Intelligence sources have since revealed that when the Austrian housepainter who was leading Germany at the time discovered the existence of concrete bollards like these LinkExternal link he called off Operation Sealion LinkExternal link and decided on Operation Barbarossa LinkExternal link instead. Thus was the course of history changed by a few tonnes of ordinary portland cement mixed with gravel.
by Brian Robert Marshall

Am inclined to doubt the bit about the course of history being changed but have never been one to let the truth get in the way of a good story - MEP
2009
I spoke briefly to the man on the boat who told me he spends his days going up and down the five or six locks on this stretch of the canal. An enviable life.
by Brian Robert Marshall

2009
The bridge carries a bridleway over the Kennet and Avon canal. The concrete bollards date from the dark days of 1939/40 when the risk of invasion by German forces was a real one. The Ministry of Defence have taken the view that the risk, though diminished, remains and that therefore so should the bollards. I have to say the knowledge that these sentinels are still here guarding uncomplaining against the foreign hordes should make all of us sleep easier in our beds. For another comforting photograph see this one LinkExternal link
by Brian Robert Marshall

2010
The bridge visible just beyond the lock is named 'New Bridge' on the Ordnance Survey 1:25K map. It's possible they have it wrong as some say that the real New Bridge is the one I was standing on to take this photograph.
by Brian Robert Marshall

2007
The lock behind the bridge is Lock No 63, Crofton Bottom Lock: sometimes it is given the same name as the bridge.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
And just for inconsistency, Beech Tree Walk Bridge behind. Anti-tank bollards can be seen on the bridge. The canal was one of the strategic lines of defence should an invasion have occurred during WWII and most bridges had these features on them.

This lock is sometimes regarded as the bottom lock of the Crofton flight. Looking in this direction it is over a kilometre to the next lock, a larger gap than any of the nine from the summit. However, others regard only the first six, or seven, to be part of the flight.
by Graham Horn

2007
I'm not sure whether camping on the towpath is legal, but here a couple of young chaps had set up a bivouac intending to spend the night.
by Dr Neil Clifton

1976
Despite its name, New Bridge was anything but new in 1976 and indeed was in such a derelict condition that it had been closed for safety. The bridge, which has not been reopened, never carried anything more than a footpath. The bridge marked as 'New Bridge' on the OS map is actually Heathy Close Bridge, but the bridge in the photograph is New Bridge and is in 2663.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2007
Although the Kennet and Avon has been restored, this bridge remains derelict and out of use. It has no parapet so would be unsafe for anyone attempting to cross it. You can see the same bridge as it was in 1976 here SU2763 : New Bridge, Kennet and Avon Canal
by Dr Neil Clifton

2010
This dilapidated and virtually useless bridge is said by some to be called 'New Bridge'. The Ordnance Survey don't agree saying that this one is New Bridge LinkExternal link It definitely has a small plaque with the number '99' affixed to it so that is what I shall call it. Bridge 99 is shown at difference places depending on which map one looks at. The OS 1:25K tallies with my GPS placing the bridge firmly in SU2663.
by Brian Robert Marshall

2010
Looking very overgrown and leading to nowhere...
by David Martin


2005 SU2763 : The Kennet & Avon canal near Great Bedwyn by Nigel Brown| 2007 SU2763 : Mill Bridge, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr Neil Clifton| 2007 SU2763 : Kennet & Avon Navigation:  Looking towards Mill Bridge 97 by Dr Neil Clifton| 2008 SU2763 : Bridge on the Kennet and Avon canal by Sarah Charlesworth
2009 SU2763 : North from Bridge 98, near Crofton by Brian Robert Marshall| 2009 SU2763 : Boat on the Kennet and Avon canal, near Crofton by Brian Robert Marshall| 1976 SU2763 : Beech Tree Walk Bridge and Crofton Bottom Lock No 63, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr Neil Clifton| 2009 SU2763 : Beech Tree Walk Bridge by Graham Horn
2009 SU2763 : Kennet and Avon Canal near Crofton by Miss Steel


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SU2662
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
================================================

Crofton Lock No.62: Crofton Crossing Bridge No.100: Crofton Lock No.61: Crofton Lock No.60: Wilton Water: Crofton Pumping Station: Crofton Lock No.59:

=================================================
1976
This is the second bottom of the nine Crofton locks, which were all unusable at the time of this photograph (1976), but are happily all now restored. The canal here is in very close proximity to the railway line.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2010
I know Bridge 99 is so named because it has a plaque on it. Lock 62's identification is derived from Dr Clifton's photographs of it.
by Brian Robert Marshall

2005
The main line is closed for maintenance, and a Class 60 diesel electric locomotive waits patiently at the head of a train of ballast wagons waiting to tip their load onto the renewed track.
by Nigel Brown

2007
Seen from the western ('uphill') end, This is the second lock from the bottom of the flight of nine Crofton locks. The disused New Bridge is seen in the distance.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
These two narrow boats sell fuel - logs, diesel and gas.
by Miss Steel

2009
An eastbound service from the West Country to London Paddington passes the canal between locks 61 and 62 near Crofton pumping station, the chimney of which can be seen behind the fourth carriage.
by Graham Horn

1976
The bridge is now so named as the road goes on to cross the railway on a level crossing here. Lock No 61 is the third one from the bottom of the Crofton flight of nine locks.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2004
Sharing a lock makes sense whenever possible. It saves a lockful of water - very important especially on some canals such as the K&A, and it also shares the work of the lock between two crews. If you see another boat coming behind, always wait for him to share the lock with you.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
This is the 7th lock of the Crofton flight, counting from the top, although some people regard the last three as not part of the flight. Behind is Crofton Crossing Bridge. Crofton Crossing predates both the canal and the adjacent railway that it crosses. It is the route of the Roman Road from Cirencester (Corinium) to Winchester (Venta Belgarum).
by Graham Horn

1999
The buildings in the distance house the Beam pumping engines that used to keep the canal fed with water. They have been preserved and are operated several times a year for visitors. The smoke shows the boilers are being stoked up for a day's work!
by David Stowell

2009
This is taken from lock 60, the lock by Crofton pumping station. The railway was built parallel to the canal in 1862. Here is squeezes between the lock and the pumping station on a speed-restricted curve. This train is heading south-west on a service from London Paddington to the West Country and can be seen just starting to take the cant into the curve.
by Graham Horn

2004
Two workable cornish beam engines, the oldest by Boulton & Watt 1812 is the oldest steam engine capable of doing its full duty in the world. This is a faint blob on the horizon in one of the other geographs for this square.
by Chris Allen

it is my hope that someone with more knowledge of Crofton Pumping Station than I will take on the task of writing an article MEP
1999
One of the boilers for the steam driven beam pumping engines. Since the canal was owned and maintained (although none too enthusiastically!) by the Great Western Railway for the later part of its working life, the brasswork around the firehole doors has that company's name cast into it.
by David Stowell

2009
Wilton Water is a reservoir created in a natural valley to provide a water supply for the Kennet and Avon Canal. Having decided to build the summit level of the canal at a higher level, to minimise the length of complicated tunnelling involved, the question of how to keep the canal supplied with water became a bigger issue, as there were not enough natural springs feeding the summit. It was decided to dam this side valley and build Crofton pumping station to pump water from here up 45 feet to the summit level. The outlet for the Crofton pump is to the right, passing under the canal. Here are conventional weir paddles to let water into the pound between locks 60 and 61 should the level in Wilton Water get to high.
by Graham Horn

2007
Lock 60, now fully restored and in working order, is the fourth one from the bottom of the Crofton flight. Seen from the western end.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2007
This shows the tailgates of Lock 59, viewed from the east. This lock is the fifth from the bottom of the flight of nine locks, thus it is the middle one.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
A narrowboat prepares to enter lock 59, the fifth of the flight of the flight of nine locks at Crofton (which ever way you are heading).
by Graham Horn

2007
The middle lock of the Crofton flight of nine. It is a pleasure to see these pristine locks now fully restored to working order and a tribute to the dedicated volunteers who made it possible.
by Dr Neil Clifton


2007 SU2662 : Crofton Lock No 62, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr Neil Clifton| 2003 SU2662 : Waterfowl near Crofton by Nigel Brown| 2003 SU2662 : Swans and cygnets at Crofton by Nigel Brown| 2009 SU2662 : Towpath, Kennet and Avon Canal by Miss Steel
2005 SU2662 : Kennet & Avon Canal by Michel Van den Berghe| 2007 SU2662 : Crofton Crossing Bridge and Lock No 61, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr Neil Clifton| 2007 SU2662 : Lock No 61 and Crofton Crossing Bridge, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr Neil Clifton| 2005 SU2662 : Geese on the Kennet & Avon canal near Crofton by Nigel Brown
2009 SU2662 : Canal at Crofton by Graham Horn| 1976 SU2662 : Crofton Engine House, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr Neil Clifton| 2007 SU2662 : Crofton Engine House, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr Neil Clifton| 2009 SU2662 : Sluice, Kennet and Avon Canal by Miss Steel
2004 SU2662 : Kennet & Avon Canal, Crofton by Dr Neil Clifton| 2008 SU2662 : Crofton - Lock by Chris Talbot

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SU2562
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
=====================================================

Freewarren Bridge No.101: Sam Farmer Lock No.58: Crofton Lock No.57: Crofton Lock No.56:

=====================================================
1976
This part of the Kennet and Avon was still unnavigable at the time of this 1976 photograph. The derelict Lock No 58 (fourth from the top of the nine-lock Crofton flight) can just be seen through the bridge, which carries a lane giving access from Great Bedwyn to Burbage.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2007
The last boatman who passed through this lock has NOT been negligent, even though the bottom gate is open. Instructions here are that locks are to be left empty. To see a picture from the same viewpoint in 1976 before restoration of the canal, see SU2562 : Freewarren Bridge, Kennet and Avon Canal
by Dr Neil Clifton

2007
A blonde girl pilots a canal boat eastwards on the canal on the hottest day of 2007 so far.
by Brian Robert Marshall

2009
This view was taken from the lock gates looking back towards the bridge from which SU2562 : Kennet & Avon Canal: Sam Farmer Lock (1) was taken. Sam Farmer, an agriculturist and philanthropist, lived at nearby Little Bedwyn Manor for 52 years between 1874 and 1926.
by Nigel Cox

2009
This bridge takes a minor road over the canal, then turns sharp right in front of the railway. The cows are in the field beyond both.
by Graham Horn

2007
Wear and tear in the stonework shows the effects of years of traffic on the canal near Crofton, Wiltshire.
by Brian Robert Marshall

2009
The sign explains it all. The Kennet and Avon Canal Trust, as the organisation leading the public support and fundraising for the restoration of the canal, encouraged the naming of various locks as a thanks to significant contributors.
by Graham Horn

2008
View looking south-west taken from the railway bridge adjoining the Sam Farmer lock on the Kennet & Avon Canal.
by Roger Davies

1976
This derelict railway bridge once carried a spur from the Midland and South Western Junction (Andover to Andoversford) line joining it to the Great Western at Freewarren Junction. There was also a west-facing spur which joined the GW at Wolfhall Junction. On the photograph, the remains of the then-derelict Lock No 57 can be seen just past the bridge abutments.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
The abutments of a railway bridge cross the canal here, a line off the Berks and Hants line towards Andover. Lock 57 is the 3rd from the top of the Crofton flight.
by Graham Horn

1992
Nearing the top of the Crofton flight with an empty stone train passing by on the Wilts & Berks main line which follows the canal closely on this stretch.
by David Stowell

2009
One lock down from the top of the Crofton flight. The railway accompanies the canal very closely here, as can be seen with a Paddington to West Country train approaching.
by Graham Horn

2009 SU2562 : Kennet & Avon Canal: Downstream of Sam Farmer Lock by Nigel Cox| 2008 SU2562 : Crofton - Sam Farmer Lock by Chris Talbot| 2007 SU2562 : Lock No 58 and Freewarren Bridge from the west, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr Neil Clifton| 2008 SU2562 : Crofton - Sam Farmer Lock by Chris Talbot
2008 SU2562 : Sam Farmer Lock, Kennet & Avon Canal by Roger Davies| 2009 SU2562 : Kennet & Avon Canal: Upstream of Sam Farmer Lock by Nigel Cox| 2007 SU2562 : Kennet & Avon Navigation:  Lock No 56 by Dr Neil Clifton

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SU2462
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
=================================================

Wolfhall Fields Bridge No.102: Crofton Top Lock No.55: Wolfhall Bridge No.103:

=================================================
1976
This lock, still derelict in 1976 at the time of this photograph, gives access to the summit level of the Kennet and Avon Canal. Wolfhall Fields bridge is an accommodation bridge only.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2007
Wolfhall Fields Bridge (not to be confused with Wolfhall Bridge further to the west) is an accommodation bridge only and there is no public right of way across it.
by Dr Neil Clifton


The leat from the Crofton Pumping Station discharges above lock 55 to the right. MEP
1976
This lock is at the eastern end of the short summit level of the canal. It is seen here as in derelict condition in 1976; however, it has. like the rest of this waterway, now been fully restored. Just beyond the lock are seen the derelict abutments of a railway bridge, which once carried a spur from the Midland and South Western Junction Andover to Andoversford line, joining the Great Western at Wolfhall Junction, just a few more yards away.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
Lock 55, the top lock of the Crofton flight and, if heading uphill, the summit of the Kennet and Avon Canal. It is all downhill to Bristol from here. In the background are the abutments of the former railway line from Andover that crossed over the Berks and Hants line to the right and continued to Swindon. The bicycle is my lock wheeling transport.
by Graham Horn

2009
This is the last lock on the rise from the east. This is summit pound of the Kennet and Avon Canal. Behind is Wolfhall Bridge.
by Graham Horn

2008
This is one of the abutments of a railway bridge, which once carried a spur line from the Midland and South Western Junction Andover to Andoversford line.
A view of the other side of the bridge can be seen by following this link.
http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/864829
by Chris Talbot

1976
Wolfhall Bridge (not to be confused with Wolfhall Fields Bridge, which is about 500 yards to the east) carries only a footpath, although some 100 yards to the north at the railway bridge, this becomes a bridleway.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2008
Bridge Number 103, the only one between the top of Crofton Locks and Bruce Tunnel
by David Martin

1976 SU2462 : Lock No 56, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr Neil Clifton| 2007 SU2462 : Lock No 56, Crofton, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr Neil Clifton| 2008 SU2462 : Burbage - Kennet And Avon Canal by Chris Talbot| 2008 SU2462 : Burbage - Kennet And Avon Canal by Chris Talbot
2007 SU2462 : Crofton Top Lock No 55 and remains of old railway bridge by Dr Neil Clifton| 2004 SU2462 : Above Crofton Top Lock, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr Neil Clifton| 2008 SU2462 : Burbage - Kennet And Avon Canal by Chris Talbot| 2005 SU2462 : Kennet & Avon Canal seen Westerly from Wolfhall Bridge by Michel Van den Berghe
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SU2363
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
====================================================================

Bruce Tunnel:

=====================================================================
1996
The short Bruce Tunnel (502 yards) is sometimes referred to as Savernake Tunnel. There is no towpath through the tunnel, but a clear path over the top.
by Dr Neil Clifton

1992
Both entrances are visible (just!)in this picture of Bruce Tunnel on the Kennet and Avon Canal.
by David Stowell

2010
A green boat approaching the tunnel entrance on green water surrounded by a mass of green foliage!
by David Martin

The Bruce Tunnell passes under the railway at approximately this point. MEP
2009
This railway line runs alongside the former Forest Hotel.
by Chris Talbot

The railway rolling stock top left is on a branch line to Marlborough which is now closed. MEP
1976
The 502-yard long Bruce (or Savernake) Tunnel has no towpath, so in the days of horse-drawn boats they would have to be 'legged' through whilst the horse was walked over the top, (he probably enjoyed the change from pulling the boat!)
by Dr Neil Clifton

2005 SU2363 : Kennet & Avon Canal by Michel Van den Berghe
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SU2263
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
==================================================

Burbage Wharf Bridge No.104: Burbage Wharf:

==================================================
1976
The first major road bridge over the Kennet and Avon for many miles, this bridge carries the A346 linking Andover with Marlborough.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
At Burbage Wharf Bridge, number 104. Taken from the adjoining railway bridge which is just as narrow and even more awkward.
The A346 is a major north/south link through Marlborough and Pewsey. A little surprising that these two narrow bridges have not yet been improved (or bypassed). Let us hope that when it is done the powers that be will do it sympathetically.
by Maurice Pullin

2005 The Burbage Wharf Crane is seen below two years before dismantling. MEP
Burbage Wharf
by Michel Van den Berghe

2007
Rotting timbers had made the crane unsafe. Here it is being dismantled prior to restoration.
More about Burbage: LinkExternal link
by Maurice Pullin

2010 SU2263 : Kennet & Avon canal at Burbage wharf by John Firth

SU2163
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1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
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Wootton Top - Cadley Lock No.54: Cadley Bridge No.105: Brimslade Lock No.53: Brimslade Bridge No.106:

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1976
Proceeding westwards. Cadley Lock begins the long descent of the canal into the valley of the Avon. Cadley Bridge, whose parapet is visible behind the lock, carries only a footpath.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2004
2005
Wootton Top Lock
by Michel Van den Berghe

2003
Brimslade Lock - No.53 - from the east with Brimslade Bridge - No.106 - behind.
Martinsell Hill is on the skyline.
by Maurice Pullin

2005 SU2163 : Kennet & Avon canal looking west to Brimslade Farm by Roger Thomas

SU2063
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1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright

Heathey Close Lock No.52: Heathey Close Bridge No.107:

There are no images available at present - Feb 2013 - for Heathey Close Lock or Heathey Close Bridge
2004
Wootton Rivers Lock in the distance.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2005
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SU1962
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1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
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Wootton Rivers Bottom Lock No.51: Wootton Rivers Bridge No.108: Wootton Rivers Farm Bridge No.109: Carrel Crown Bridge No.110:

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1976
After clearing Wootton Rivers Bottom Lock, the westward-bound boatman will enjoy a long lock-free pound in which to prepare himself for the shock to his system which is waiting for him at Devizes. Wootton Rivers Bridge carries a minor metalled road.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2004
The boat is travelling east. The lock can just be seen on the extreme left of the photograph.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
The lock at Wootton Rivers attracts not only boaters but lots of tourist. The canal adds to the pretty village.
by Miss Steel

2007
This slightly foreshortened view shows a canal boat leaving the lock to continue a journey east.
by Brian Robert Marshall

The type of leakage seen below is usually caused by steerers who allow their boats to rub against lock gates when entering and leaving locks.
by MEP
2007
A bit leaky and with a healthy growth of vegetation, the gates do well enough for long enough to allow a boat through as other images for this square will show.
by Brian Robert Marshall

2007
Viewed from the road bridge over the canal looking west to the next bridge.
by Brian Robert Marshall

2002
Carrel Crown Bridge from the east.
There seems to be some doubt over the spelling of this bridge name, the early Nicholsons Guide available in the 1970's calls it Curret Crown Bridge, the current Nicholsons and OS Explorer 157 call it Carrel Crown Bridge.
by Maurice Pullin

2004 SU1962 : Kennet and Avon Canal at Wootton Rivers by Chris Gunns| 2007 SU1962 : Lock-keeper's cottage, Wootton Rivers, Wiltshire by Brian Robert Marshall| 2009 SU1962 : Kennet and Avon Canal, Wootton Rivers by Miss Steel| 2009 SU1962 : Kennet and Avon Canal, Wootton Rivers by Miss Steel
2005 SU1962 : Kennet & Avon Canal by Michel Van den Berghe| 2009 SU1962 : Bridge 110, Kennet and Avon Canal by Miss Steel| 2009 SU1962 : Bridge 110, Kennet and Avon Canal by Miss Steel

SU1862
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1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
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New Mill Bridge No.111:

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2005
2004
New Mill Bridge from the west.
by Maurice Pullin

SU1761
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1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright

Milkhouse Water Bridge No.112:

1976
A very peaceful stretch of canal here. The bridge carries only a minor metalled road.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2002
Milkhouse Water Bridge is seen here from the east.
Hills to the north of the canal between Devizes and Wootton Rivers form the southern edge of the Marlborough Downs, all are worth the walk to the top, the walk from this bridge to Martinsell Hill and Giants Cave is particularly recommended.
OS Explorer Map 157 is useful.
by Maurice Pullin

2005
Milkhouse Water Bridge
by Michel Van den Berghe

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SU1661
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
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Pains Bridge No.113:

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1999
2005
Pains Bridge
by Michel Van den Berghe

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SU1561
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1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
=================================================

Pewsey Wharf: Pewsey Bridge No.114: Bristow Bridge No.115:

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1992
The old warehouse in the 1992 photograph has now become a pub and restaurant. It seems to be popular with both passing boat and road traffic and a car park has been laid out. The wharf originally dealt with trade to and from the Vale of Pewsey eg coal from Somerset.
by Colin Smith

2003
The Waterfront, when photographed in April 2003, described itself as a licensed cafe & restaurant. Over the succeeding years it seems to have developed into a fully fledged pub, albeit still with an emphasis on food. It is sometimes now referred to as The Waterfront Inn, although this may just be a popular name for it. Over the years the signage has changed, and been simplified. In 2003 it could perhaps be described as overkill, and certainly detracted from the building's appearance.
by P L Chadwick

2010
Cafe and bar at Pewsey Wharf.
by Miss Steel

1976
A welcome sight for the westward traveller on foot or by boat, for the excellent 'French Horn' public house is near at hand, with very good beer and also food. (just visible at far right of picture). Pewsey Bridge carries the A345; the railway station is half mile south from the bridge.
by Dr Neil Clifton

1999
2007
The bridge over the Kennet and Avon Canal at Pewsey Wharf carries the A345 from Salisbury to Marlborough.
by Miss Steel

1999
Looking west from Pewsey Bridge 114.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2007
The Kennet and Avon Canal near Pewsey Wharf.
by Miss Steel

1976
Linear mooring on the offside bank is not popular with other boaters.
by Dr Neil Clifton

1963
The Kennet & Avon Canal was still hard frozen in February 1963 during one of the coldest winters of the 20th century. In Wiltshire the snow began on Boxing Day 1962 and did not thaw until the first week of March 63. Canals and ponds became natural skating rinks.
by Gordon Hatton

1999 SU1561 : Bridge near Pewsey Wharf by Trevor Rickard| 2009 SU1561 : The Waterfront at Pewsey Wharf by andy dolman| 2003 SU1561 : Pewsey Wharf, Kennet & Avon Canal by P L Chadwick| 2010 SU1561 : Boats at Pewsey Wharf by Miss Steel
1999 SU1561 : Boats tied up near Pewsey Wharf by Trevor Rickard| 1996 SU1561 : Pewsey Bridge 114, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr Neil Clifton| 2007 SU1561 : Kennet and Avon Canal by Miss Steel| 2009 SU1561 : Kennet and Avon Canal near Pewsey by Miss Steel
1976 SU1561 : Bristow Bridge, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr Neil Clifton| 1996 SU1561 : Bristow Bridge, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr Neil Clifton| 2009 SU1561 : Kennet and Avon Canal near Pewsey by Miss Steel
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SU1461
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
=================================================

Stowell Park Footbridge No.116: Wilcot Bridge No.117:

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1963
Taken in February 1963 during one of the coldest winters of the 20th century. It is likely that the canal was ice covered for most of its length. Taken from just west of Bristow Bridge.
by Gordon Hatton

1996
1996
2009
Canal bridge No. 117 at Wilcott.
by Miss Steel

2009
The canal heads east towards Stowell Park with a minor road to the north. Taken from Wilcot Bridge.
by Miss Steel

2005 SU1461 : Kennet & Avon Canal by Michel Van den Berghe| 2009 SU1461 : Kennet and Avon Canal, Wilcot by Miss Steel

SU1361
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
=======================================================

Wilcot Swing Bridge No.118: Bowdens Bridge No.119:

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1976
An accommodation bridge only and normally left open for the canal.
by Dr Neil Clifton

1996
As far as I am aware, this bridge has not been restored to use.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2004
Bowden's Bridge from the east.
by Maurice Pullin

2005-SU1361 : Kennet & Avon Canal by Michel Van den Berghe| 1996-SU1361 : Bowden's Bridge 119, Kennet and Avon Canal by Dr Neil Clifton
SU1360
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
========================================================

Wilcot Wide Water:

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2008
A view east along the canal from Wide Water, a widening in the canal beside Ladies Bridge. There are signs saying that the widening is too shallow to be used for turning, but I guess that that was its original purpose.
by Andrew Smith

2008
Looking towards Ladies Bridge. Wilcot Withy Wood is on the left whilst a mixture of arable and pastoral farmland is behind the hedge to the right.
by Andrew Smith

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SU1260
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
==========================================================

Lady's or Ladies Bridge No.120:

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1976
The name of this bridge is often mis-spelled as ' Lady's Bridge'. I believe the name derives from the use of the bridge (which only carries a footpath) by nuns, presumably from Wilcot Manor.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2004
This is the spelling of the name according to Ordnance Survey. A colleague has suggested it should be Lady's Bridge.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2008
Looking west from Ladies (or should that be Lady's or Ladies'?) Bridge beside Cocklebury Farm.
by Andrew Smith

2008
Looking down on the Kennet and Avon Canal and a new house being built on the site of Cocklebury Farm.
by Andrew Smith

1992 SU1260 : Ladies Bridge by David Stowell
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SU1160
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
====================================================

Woodborough Fields Bridge No.121:

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2008]
Looking west to the bridge on the bridleway between the village and Woodborough Hill.
by Andrew Smith

1976
Seen here from the east. Clearly, secret plans had been discovered showing that Hitler intended to cross the Kennet and Avon with tanks here, so precautions against this were taken. Otherwise the only crossing traffic is horses, cycles and pedestrians on the bridleway.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2008
Looking east from the bridge on the bridleway below Woodborough Hill. The towpath is on the left here and is part of the White Horse Trail, a recreational route linking the White Horses of Wiltshire.
by Andrew Smith

1976
A bridleway crosses the bridge leading northwards to the summit of Woodborough Hill, 208 metres o.d.
by Dr Neil Clifton

1976
Abandoned many years ago on the Kennet and Avon, near Woodborough
by Dr Neil Clifton

2008
Viewed from the bridge on the bridleway below Woodborough Hill. The canal contours near the foot of the hillside.
by Andrew Smith

SU1061
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1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
======================================================

Alton Valley Bridge No.123: Honey Street Bridge No.124:

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1977
The remote Alton Valley Bridge is an accommodation bridge only. It is seen here from the east.
by Dr Neil Clifton

1977
The bridge is seen here from the east. It carries a locslly important though unclassified north to south road.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2002
Honeystreet after restoration with George Gibson's boatyard to the right.
by Maurice Pullin

1977
Looking from the west. The disused wharf is seen at the left.
by Dr Neil Clifton

1992
The Barge Inn beside the Kennet and Avon canal
by David Stowell

2009
The canal at this point passes the Barge Inn. The inn at one time had its own brewery, bakehouse and slaughterhouse and was able to supply canal boats as they passed.
by Miss Steel

2009
A pill box stands beside the canal opposite the Barge Inn. There are a number of these structures along the canal as it was a line of defence during WWII. The Alton Barnes White Horse is in the distance.
by Miss Steel

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SU0961
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
===================================================

Stanton Bridge No.125:

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1977
Stanton Bridge carries a minor metalled road, so why the 'tank trap' visible on the right is there is a mystery, as clearly it cannot obstruct the passage of the bridge.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2005
Stanton Bridge
by Michel Van den Berghe

2005 SU0961 : Kennet & Avon Canal by Michel Van den Berghe

SU0962
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
===================================================

England's Bridge No.126:

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1977
This bridge, here seen from the east, carries a right of way on foot only, otherwise it is of little importance.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2004
The "bridge 'oles" on this canal as originally designed by John Rennie are a little eccentric, the towpath side being slightly flattened.
Rennie was also the engineer of the Lancaster Canal so it is not surprising that the bridges there have a similar appearance.
by Maurice Pullin


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SU0862
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
===============================================
2007
The White Horse Trail also runs along the towpath beside this section of the canal.
by Doug Lee

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SU0762
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1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
=================================================

All Cannings Bridge No.127: Woodway Bridge No.128:

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2009
The Kennet and Avon Canal is not crystal clear!
by Russel Wills

2009
Looking east along the canal from All Cannings Bridge.
by Miss Steel

2010
When I chanced upon this scene I thought I'd been transported to the harbour at Monte Carlo. The beauty of these craft is simply breathtaking.
by Brian Robert Marshall

1977
Taken from the west. The bridge carries an important unclassified road.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2006
A pair of swans on the Kennet and Avon canal near All Cannings bridge.
by Phil Williams

2002
2009
On the Kennet & Avon Canal.
by Russel Wills

2008
Looking west from Woodway Bridge north of the village.
by Andrew Smith

SU0662
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright

Allington Swing Bridge No.129:

1977
This bridge carries a footpath only, albeit with right of way. For this reason it is sometimes known as Allington Foot Swing Bridge.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
On the Kennet and Avon Canal.
by Russel Wills

2009 Shouldn't it say something about taking your boat through? MEP
At Allington swing bridge.
by Russel Wills

2009
Close to Allington swing bridge.
by Russel Wills

SU0562
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
====================================================

Allington Bridge No.130: Norton Fields Swing Bridge No.131:

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1977
Allington Bridge, seen here from the east, is an accommodation bridge only, carrying a farm road which, however, peters out some 500 metres further south at the edge of a small wood.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2003
An ice covered Kennet and Avon Canal passes under a bridge which allows a farmer access to fields on either side of the canal
by Rog Frost

This bridge has now been abandoned and closed permanently. MEP
1977
One of the least important bridges on the canal, it is an accommodation bridge only and does not even have a footpath leading to it from either side.
by Dr Neil Clifton

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SU0563
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
======================================================

Horton Chain Bridge No.132

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1977
It is not unusual to encounter stern paddle wheel boats on this particular canal, but this was the only side-paddler I saw. Named 'Charlotte Dundas', it obviously would not be usable on canals with 7ft locks.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
The canal from Horton Chain Bridge.
by Miss Steel

1977
This bridge is seen here from the south, (if the canal were pulled out into a straight line it would be the east, but there is a big bend here). It lies on a very important east-west minor road which gives access into Devizes from a number of villages on east Wiltshire.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009
The canal from Horton Chain Bridge.
by Miss Steel

2005
Horton Chain Bridge
by Michel Van den Berghe

2009 SU0563 : Fields and the Kennet and Avon canal (in the trees) near Horton by Rob Purvis

SU0463
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1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
======================================================

Bishops Cannings Swing Bridge No.133

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2004
The bridge here is seen from the east.
by Maurice Pullin

1977
Seen here from the western side, this bridge just carries a public footway, handy no doubt for Horton residents intent on a visit to the pub. in Bishops Canning and a considerable save over the distance by road.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2005
Looking to the west from Bishops Cannings Swing Bridge.
by Michel Van den Berghe

SU0363
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1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
=======================================================

Horton Bridge No.134

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2009
The canal was opened in 1810 so will celebrate its 200th anniversary in 2010.
by Nigel Cox

2009
The Kennet and Avon is clearing frozen over at this point. Image taken from bridge 134, Horton Bridge.
by Miss Steel

2009
It's either an optical illusion or my camera but I could swear that the bridge is not symmetrical. Anyway this is Horton Bridge taking Horton Road over the canal.

Update February 2011

I am indebted to a fellow Geographer, Maurice Pullin, for the following explanation "Not an optical illusion or a camera fault. As designed by John Rennie. The extra height over the towpath allowed horses to pass under without knocking their heads. If the bridge had been symmetrical it would have been much higher in the middle. All the original fixed bridges on the K&A were built this way, also bridges on the Lancaster Canal, another wide canal engineered by John Rennie."
by Nigel Cox

2009
This is a Wadworth Brewery pub at the Horton Bridge crossing of the Kennet and Avon Canal. The brewery's own website describes it as pre-dating the canal and from around 1800, whereas the canal was opened here in 1810. However it is some distance from the nearest village and it is difficult to understand the reason for it being built here unless the canal was already under construction. Horton Bridge is just visible on the left.
by Nigel Cox

1977
There used to be a swing bridge here, and for years after its replacement by this fixed bridge, it was referred to as Horton 'Swing' Bridge - which, of course, led to confusion with Horton Fields Swing Bridge, some distance to the east.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2004
Moorings are provided specifically for patrons of the public house, where the excellent local Wadworth's 6X can be enjoyed, as well as good food.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2009 SU0363 : Kennet and Avon Canal, Horton by Miss Steel| 2004 SU0363 : The Bridge Inn at Horton by Trevor Pearce-Jones
SU0362
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1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
=========================================================

Laywood Bridge No.135

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1977
Seen from the western side. The bridge carries a footpath which gives access from the towpath to the unclassified Horton Road, about a quarter of a mile away.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2005 SU0362 : Kennet & Avon Canal by Michel Van den Berghe| 2005 SU0362 : Kennet & Avon Canal by Michel Van den Berghe| 2001 SU0362 : Leywood Bridge in Winter by Trevor Pearce-Jones
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SU0262
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
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2004
This was taken near Leywood by the sluice gate that drains water from the canaland into a stream which passes below the canal, the bridge in view is Leywood Bridge in SU0362
by Trevor Pearce-Jones

SU0162
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1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
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Coate Bridge No.136: Brickham Bridge No.137:

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2003
Dr.Clifton's photo shows Coate Bridge as it was in 1977.
It has since been completely rebuilt due to development on both sides of the canal, private housing to the left as we see it, business and housing to the right.
This view is from the east.
by Maurice Pullin

1977
Seen from the west. Sometimes called Coate Road Bridge, as it is some two miles away from the village of Coate, reached by the minor road over the bridge.
by Dr Neil Clifton

1977
The stern wheel paddler was not an uncommon type of boat to be seen on the Kennet and Avon at the time of my 1977 visit, but more recently most of them seem to have disappeared or have been converted to a more conventional form of propulsion.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2007
Minor lane from the A361 London Road, that crosses the Kennet and Avon Canal in Devizes.
by Chris Heaton

SU0161
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1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
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London Road Bridge No.138

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2007
Taken just to the east of London Road Bridge where the canal makes a sharp ninety degree turn.
by Chris Heaton

1977
Seen from the east, this important bridge carries the busy A361, giving access from Devizes to the large town - city in all but name - of Swindon.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2007
Carries the A361 over the Kennet and Avon Canal in Devizes, Wiltshire.
by Chris Heaton

2010
Seven miles to Beckhampton and the A4 then on to Avebury and Swindon.
The lorry is crossing the bridge over the Kennet & Avon Canal.
Note the red brick houses to the right, typical of the area.
by Maurice Pullin

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SU0061
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1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
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Park Bridge No.139: Cemetery Road Bridge No.140: Devizes Wharf:

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2007
This looks west up the Kennet and Avon Canal from Park Bridge, observed while walking the Wessex Ridgeway
by Chris Heaton

1977
Seen from the east. The bridge carries a minor road leading from the Town Centre to the cemetery to the north of Devizes.
by Dr Neil Clifton

2010
The Kennet and Avon towpath rising to the footbridge, where it crosses to the other side of the canal. Devizes town wharf, and Wadworth's brewery are on the opposite side of the canal, and to ensure their security, the towpath was made to swap sides for 500 metres.
by Christine Johnstone

2007 You won't be wasting time writing comments then Ben.
It is the 2007 CAMRA Beer Festival day.
by Ben Croft

1999
View westwards along the Kennet & Avon Canal at Devizes Wharf to the theatre building on the left. The theatre is a converted warehouse and has an intimate atmosphere provided by the 96-seat capacity. The theatre company has a really good reputation.
http://www.wharftheatre.co.uk/
by Trevor Rickard

2010
On the Kennet and Avon Canal - leisure not commerce is the main use now.
by Russel Wills

2009
The Devizes wharf, on the Kennet & Avon Canal, features a small canal museum/shop and a place to relax in pleasant surroundings.
by Chris Downer

2010
The building opposite is the headquarters of the Kennet & Avon Canal Trust. It also houses the Trust Museum and the Trust Shop. </td></tr><tr><td>MEP

2010
The red brick canal warehouse is now the Wharf Theatre. Viewed from the towpath on the opposite side of the canal.
by David Martin

2009
Barrels are towered high, left of picture, in the yard of the Wadworth's brewery alongside the Kennet & Avon Canal.
by Chris Downer

2009
Looking eastbound along the canal, with a colourful display of flowers on the bank on the left.
by Chris Downer

2007
Facing east north east. The photographer was standing on a lock-gate when the image was obtained.
by Brian Robert Marshall

DEVIZES

Here, with our backs (well, Brian's back) to the top lock of the Devizes flight, we must end this part of our trip along the Kennet & Avon Canal; but we cannot go without paying our respects to two of Devizes' most venerated citizens performing a vital function.
2007
Royal and Max provide the horsepower at the CAMRA Beer Festival.
by Ben Croft

Suggestions welcome
In preparing this article have paid much attention to descriptions, saves writing them myself.
Suggestion for Category: "Navigable Inland Waterways"

My apologies if your favourite canal pic. has been omitted from this collection it will be for one or both of the following reasons:
1/ The description was inadequate or there was a better one of the same subject.
2/ The picture was repetitive or of poor quality.
(left a few of my own out for one or both of the above reasons)[]


Revised February 2013

KML

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