River Trent - The Derbyshire and Leicestershire Trent

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Creative Commons Licence [Some Rights Reserved]   Text © Copyright May 2010, John M; licensed for re-use under a Creative Commons Licence.
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River Trent

The River Trent, the third longest river in England emerges at around 919ft(280m)on Biddulph Moor and flows for 185 miles (298km) eventually discharging into the Humber Estuary at Trent Falls. The limit of navigation is at Burton on Trent.

This section of river leaves the Staffordshire boundary at Burton-on-Trent and follows the river downstream to Long Eaton. Along this section it is a significant lowland river with arable farming on brown earth based alluvial soils.

Burton to Willington Bridge


1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
North of Burton-on-Trent below the Burton Flour Mills the river forms the county boundary between Staffordshire and Derbyshire as far as the confluence with the River Dove.


The River Dove joins the Trent below Newton Solney. The River Dove with its tributaries the River Manifold and River Hamps has catchments in the 'White Peak' limestone area of the southern Peak District.

SK2623 : Weir on the River Trent by John M SK2725 : River Trent - Upstream at Newton Solney by John M SK2726 : Mouth of the Dove (1) by Phil Myott SK2826 : Pipe Bridge over the River Trent by John M SK2926 : Meadow Overlooking the River Trent by Jonathan Clitheroe

The floodplain is characterised by mineral extraction with large water filled gravel pits.

The first crossing point is at Willington where the current stone bridge dates from 1836 and replaced a ford and ferry. The toll was removed from the bridge in 1898.

SK2927 : River Trent From Willington Bridge by Rob Court SK2927 : Willington Bridge by Jerry Evans SK2927 : Willington Bridge by John M SK2927 : Willington - Bridge by Dave Bevis SK3028 : Ford on the River Trent at Ferry Meadow by John M SK3028 : River Trent downstream at Ferry Meadow by John M

Willington Bridge to Swarkestone

The Trent Vale was noted for the number of coal burning power stations giving it the nickname 'Megawatt Valley' and led to higher water temperatures. Many of the power stations have disappeared along with the collieries that supplied them with fuel. Willington 'A' Power Station opened in 1954 and closed in 1995 and the 'B' Station closed in 1999. There are plans for a new 2GW gas fired station on the site.

SK2927 : Trent floodplain east of Willington Bridge by Jerry Evans SK3128 : Cooling Towers by Jerry Evans

Another historic crossing point was at Twyford where a chain ferry once operated.

SK3228 : River Trent at Twyford by Jerry Evans SK3228 : Chain ferry post at Twyford by Jerry Evans SK3228 : Former chain ferry across River Trent by John M SK3228 : The Trent at Twyford by Peter Shone

Some large meanders takes the river past Ingleby

SK3427 : Sand and gravel pit by John Poyser SK3427 : Overlooking the Trent by Tim Heaton SK3427 : Trent Valley Way (proposed W extension) by Tim Heaton SK3427 : Overlooking the Trent, west of Ingleby by Tim Heaton

and Barrow

SK3527 : River Trent, Ingleby by Phil Myott SK3528 : River Trent upstream at Barrow-on-Trent by John M SK3528 : Riverside houses, Barrow upon Trent by Jerry Evans SK3528 : River Trent downstream at Barrow -on -Trent by John M

The gravel pits at Stanton-by-Bridge are used by a Sailing Club.

SK3627 : Laser Racing on Swarkestone Lake by Malcolm Reeve SK3627 : Former gravel workings near Swarkestone by Jerry Evans

The next crossing point at Swarkestone has been here for 800 years and at three quarters of a mile is the longest stone bridge and causeway in the country. The current bridge dates from the late 18th century.

SK3628 : Swarkestone Bridge over the River Trent by John M SK3628 : Swarkestone Bridge by Rob Bradford SK3628 : Swarkestone Causeway by Ian Calderwood SK3627 : Swarkestone Causeway by Jerry Evans SK3727 : Swarkestone Causeway by Alan Murray-Rust


SK3628 : Bonnie Prince Charlie Memorial by John M
It was also to mark the limit of Bonnie Prince Charlie’s rebellion in 1745. An advance party had secured the crossing before the decision was taken to return to Scotland and eventual defeat at Culloden.

KML

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