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Points and Moderation

Do you accept photos taken beneath a named square, e.g. mines, culverts bunkers etc?
Yes provided they are accurately located and meet the usual criteria.

If the underground space is artificial such as a mine or railway tunnel, they can only be classed as "accepted", i.e. tagged as "inside" or "close look", rather than qualifying as a "Geograph".

If the underground space is natural such as a sea-cave, limestone cave etc., then if there is a large enough space in view a Geograph status is possible, but in a small space it would still be accepted as a "close look".

With the exception of straight tunnels, getting an accurate position underground in the absence of a GPS signal and without a detailed map of a cave system is tricky. In many cases it may be best just to give 4-figure grid reference (i.e. not try to locate the photo within the square).
· contributed by Gerald England, Dec 2015 · Edit this answer (Open for editing by anyone) · Provide an alternative answer!
I've had a photo made a 'supplemental' - what does that mean?
(From 11 May 2016 the Supplemental Classification is replaced by Image Type Tags:
see http://www.geograph.org.uk/article/Image-Type-Tags-updateExternal link ).

see also http://www.nearby.org.uk/geograph/answers/view.php?id=16External link

Supplementals are all photos that are not Geographs.

Any photographs that show close up details without sufficient surrounding context to be deemed geographs are classed as supplemental as are photographs of the insides of buildings. Also photographs taken from outside the grid square are commonly referred to as cross-grid supplemantals.

Aerial and underground shots are always classed as supplementals as are "all-at-sea" photographs with no land or permanent structure (such as a fixed navigational aid) in the square.

The distinction may be "borderline" in some instances and different moderaters' decisions might fall another side of the border but such decisions are initially based on their interpretation of the guidelines and generally without reference to other similar images.

The "aesthetic quality" of the image is irrelevant.
· contributed by Gerald England, Jun 2011 · Edit this answer (Open for editing by anyone) · Provide an alternative answer!

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