TF3642 : The Church of St Guthlac, Fishtoft

taken 4 years ago, near to Fishtoft, Lincolnshire, Great Britain

The Church of St Guthlac, Fishtoft
The Church of St Guthlac, Fishtoft
Window in the chapel - A Saxon church building stood on or near the present site. The Doomsday Survey of 1085 makes reference to it. There is a tradition that the monks and other builders employed by the Abbey re-built the church at Fishtoft at the same time they were building a cell for the monks of Crowland in the church at Freiston.
The style is Perpendicular, with traces of Norman architecture. The chancel is Norman with the insertion of Perpendicular windows. It is said that there could have been a Norman nave, because stones with the Norman decorations can be seen in the walls of the Nave and the scarcity of stone in the district would account for the use of the older material at the time of re-building the nave.
There are two features in the church of Early English origin; the lancet window in the south wall of the chancel which now contains the stained glass depicting St. Guthlac. The other feature is the headstone of the lancet window in the south wall of the nave between two of the arcades. This suggests that sometime after 1200 the Norman church was altered and extended. The list of Rectors, in the church, starts 1274.
Some time after 1300 further enlargements and alterations took place. The most extensive alterations and additions took place during the Perpendicular period. Sometime after 1400 a major re-building of the nave and the addition of the tower would have taken place. From this time the church consisted of the chancel, nave, the north and south aisles, and the tower, which stands at the west end of the nave and is evidently the latest addition to the structure. The north aisle has four windows Perpendicular style and the south aisle three.
A 16th century clerestory of five windows on each side lights the upper part of the nave. The characteristic style of windows can be seen in the west wall of the south aisle and in the tower over the west door. The font, chancel screen and much of the restored pulpit are also originally from this period.
Apart from repairs, no major work was carried out on the church until the 19th century when from 1853-54 the Rector, Rev Henry Holdsworth undertook the organisation and supervision of a general restoration. This included the removal of all the plastering from the walls and re pointing of stonework. The vestry was built on to the north wall of the chancel, and the porch was rebuilt on the south aisle.
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TF3642, 41 images   (more nearby )
Photographer
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Date Taken
Thursday, 26 September, 2013   (more nearby)
Submitted
Thursday, 3 October, 2013
Geographical Context
Historic sites and artefacts  Religious sites 
Subject Location
OSGB36: geotagged! TF 3645 4253 [10m precision]
WGS84: 52:57.7670N 0:1.8048E
Camera Location
OSGB36: geotagged! TF 3645 4254
View Direction
SOUTH (about 180 degrees)
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