ST8477 : Grade I listed Church of St Andrew, Castle Combe

taken 4 years ago, near to Castle Combe, Wiltshire, Great Britain

Grade I listed Church of St Andrew, Castle Combe
Grade I listed Church of St Andrew, Castle Combe
The parish church is part of the Church of England Diocese of Bristol. The church's website states that the church was founded in the 13th century. The building has been extended over a long period of time. The nave was added in the 14th century. The tower, begun in 1434, was not completed until the 16th century. By the 1850s much of the church had fallen into disrepair and had to be rebuilt.
At the base of the tower stands the faceless clock, believed to have been made by a local blacksmith.
It is one of the most ancient working clocks in the country.

The church was Grade I listed (the highest category) in 1960.
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ST8477, 197 images   (more nearby )
Photographer
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Date Taken
Sunday, 24 November, 2013   (more nearby)
Submitted
Tuesday, 23 September, 2014
Geographical Context
Village, Rural settlement  Religious sites 
Subject Location
OSGB36: geotagged! ST 8414 7718 [10m precision]
WGS84: 51:29.6003N 2:13.7904W
Camera Location
OSGB36: geotagged! ST 8418 7718
View Direction
WEST (about 270 degrees)
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Other Tags
Church  Anglican  Grade I Listed 

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Image classification(about): Geograph
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