TA0339 : Church of St Mary

taken 1 year ago, near to Beverley, East Riding of Yorkshire, Great Britain

This is 1 of 16 images, with title Church of St Mary in this square
Church of St Mary
Church of St Mary
St Mary's church, Beverley
Grade I listed

The church, founded in 1120, consists of a central tower, with three bay chancel, a six bay aisled nave with clerestory, south porch, and a north east transept chapel of circa 1280. Externally the church has an embattled parapets and crocketted pinnacles. It is mostly Perpendicular and Decorated.

The church was originally constructed as a rectangular building with nave, central tower and chancel, with a thatched roof. It was originally a Chapel of Ease to the Minster.
The original Norman church was planned on a large scale; the plinths of the external buttresses of the Normal church may be seen at the entrance to St Katherine’s Chapel. The only other visible remains of the Norman building are the interior arch of the door to the South Porch, and the zigzag ornament over the arcade to the North Transept.
Due to fire damage in the Minster in 1188, and the collapse of its tower in 1213, the use of St Mary's expanded. The north transept was added between 1185 and 1200, followed by the south transept between 1212 and 1220. Later on in the 13th century the chancel was extended and a larger nave was constructed. At the end of the 13th century the north chapel and crypt were added. The crypt contains over 200 Masons marks, and was once used as a charmel house.

At the beginning of the 14th century further extension works were undertaken, and again in the mid-14th century, when work began on a new west front. Due to the Black Death there was a shortage of craftsmen and progress was slow. At the end of the 14th century the tower was heightened and the nave extended, adding the clerestory.
In 1520, during a service, the tower collapsed, causing loss of life and damage to the church. The tower and nave were rebuilt and by 1530 the church looked much as it does today.

There have been several restorations, one in the mid 19th century by Pugin, the other in the 1860s by George Gilbert Scott.
The church has a fine selection of Misericords dating from 1445, and the chancel has a unique painted ceiling originally from 1445 with 40 panels depicting the Kings of England.
There are several monuments to the Warton family in the church.

There is only a small piece of medieval stained glass in one of the north windows, most of the windows are 19th century.

The organ is a four manual, originally by Forster and Andrews.

Grade I & A listed buildings and structures
Grade I listed buildings and structures are of exceptional importance and even internationally important. There are over 6000 in the country. Only 2.5% of listed buildings are Grade I listed.
In Scotland the classification is A
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Grid Square
TA0339, 2598 images   (more nearby )
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Date Taken
Monday, 2 January, 2017   (more nearby)
Wednesday, 12 July, 2017
Geographical Context
Historic sites and artefacts  Religious sites 
Subject Location
OSGB36: geotagged! TA 0315 3979 [10m precision]
WGS84: 53:50.6472N 0:26.0222W
Camera Location
OSGB36: geotagged! TA 0310 3978
View Direction
EAST (about 90 degrees)
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Image Type (about): geograph 
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