Bridges over the Mersey at Runcorn :: Shared Description

The Runcorn–Widnes Bridge was opened by Princess Alexandra in 1961 and replaced a transporter bridge, which opened in 1905 and was the largest of its type in the world. The 1901 red-sandstone power house, below the Mersey Hotel, marks the position of the northern tower of the earlier bridge. The current road bridge, widened in 1975–77 and renamed the Silver Jubilee Bridge, is a compression arch suspended-deck bridge, similar in design to the Sydney Harbour Bridge. The main span is 330 metres (1,082 feet) long and carries the road 24 metres (80 feet) above the waters of the Ship Canal. The adjacent Runcorn Railway Bridge opened in 1868; the three heraldic shields visible from the road bridge show the Liver Bird of Liverpool, Britannia (the crest of the London and North West Railway, who commissioned its construction) and the Arms of the City of London. Both bridges, and the power house, are Grade-II listed. Construction of a new road bridge, the Mersey Gateway, is proposed a mile upstream of the current bridges. (From my forthcoming book, Adventurous Pub Walks in Cheshire.) Read more on Wikipedia: LinkExternal link
by Dave Dunford
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4 images use this description:

SJ5083 : Runcorn-Widnes Bridge by Dave Dunford
SJ5183 : Oakland Street, West Bank by Dave Dunford
SJ5183 : West Bank from Runcorn Bridge by Dave Dunford
SJ5083 : Approaching The Bridge by Gerald England


These Shared Descriptions are common to multiple images. For example, you can create a generic description for an object shown in a photo, and reuse the description on all photos of the object. All descriptions are public and shared between contributors, i.e. you can reuse a description created by others, just as they can use yours.
Created: Mon, 1 Feb 2010, Updated: Tue, 2 Feb 2010

The 'Shared Description' text on this page is Copyright 2010 Dave Dunford, however it is specifically licensed so that contributors can reuse it on their own images without restriction.

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