Castley - Harrogate District - North Yorkshire

Creative Commons Licence [Some Rights Reserved]   Text © Copyright January 2007, Humphrey Bolton; licensed for re-use under a Creative Commons Licence.
Images also under a similar Creative Commons Licence.


Castley, Harrogate District, North Yorkshire

Introduction

This is the first of a series of articles about civil parishes. It will be expanded as further information and photographs are available. The photographs so far are by myself, Roger Crowther, Roger Foyle and Chris Heaton.

References to 'the 1850 map' mean the OS 6"/mile map, 1st edition, which can be seen on old-maps.co.uk. Jefferys's map of 1775 was a series of maps at 1"/mile covering Yorkshire.

The grid square of Castley village is SE2645. Here is a map showing the boundary of Castley: LinkExternal link

History

Castley is a township of the ancient parish of Leathley. It became a separate civil parish in 1866, later becoming part of the Wharfedale Rural District of the West Riding, and in 1974 the Harrogate District of North Yorkshire. There was a boundary change in 1883, probably when a small detached part of Castley was given to Leathley.

Most of the township was in the Forest of Knaresborough, which apparently still existed in 1776 as a perambulation of the boundary in that year was recorded on the 6 map of 1850.

The manor was held by the Arthington family in ancient times.

The population was 110 in 1848.

Geography

The underlying rock is millstone grit. The village is on a small hill within a loop of the River Wharfe.

SE2545 (Images)


1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright


From the A658 to the west, Castley Lane leads, not surprisingly, to Castley, entering the civil parish at SE254457 (Images) and reaching the village sign at SE257458 (Images) :

SE2545 : Entering Castley by Chris Heaton

An alternative route is via the riverside footpath, seen here at SE255455 (Images) :

SE2545 : River Wharfe between Pool and Castley by Chris Heaton

SE2546 (Images)


1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright


The eastern part of this square is in Castley, and contains an industrial (?) premises on the A658 road and Riffa Manor.

SE2547 (Images)


1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright


The high ground in the northern part of Castley was called Castley Moor, and would have been common land in medieval times. The old road from Leathley to Harrogate, as shown on Jefferys's map of 1775 passed through Riffa Wood (bridle road on the 1850 map) to cut across the extreme northern corner of Castley. It is now marked as an 'other right-of-way'. It then continued unfenced via Newby to the milestone at Wescoe Hill, with branches to Huby.

SE2645 (Images)


1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright


Castley is on the north side of the River Wharfe. However at SE265459 (Images) the parish boundary at the acute bend in the river follows what looks on the map, but not on the ground, to be an old river meander on the left side of the following photograph:

SE2645 : The River Wharfe, Castley by Humphrey Bolton

This square is dominated by the railway viaduct at SE263455 (Images) .

SE2645 : Arthington Viaduct by Roger Crowther

The Wharfedale Viaduct carries the railway over the River Wharfe. It was completed in 1849. The Engineer was Thomas Grainger and the contractor James Bray. It is 460m long, with 21 round arches having roll-moulding at springer level. The parapet also has roll moulding, and stepped end-blocks at the point where it meets the embankment. This viaduct over the river Wharfe was the work of the Leeds and Thirsk Railway Company, which became the Leeds Northern Railway in 1851.
The village street, Castley Lane, loops through the northern part of this square. On it, at SE267458 (Images) , is Castley Hall, which was built by Robert Dyneley shortly before 1702. It is of coursed gritstone, with a five-bay front, and has chamfered alternate quoins at the corners. The central doorway has a broken segmental pediment. The house has its back to the road. Part at least of the house is used as offices for engineering consultants.

SE2645 : Castley Hall, Castley by Humphrey Bolton

Looking to the north, there is a boggy field ineffectively drained by a watercourse that is marked 'Rampart' on the 1850 map.

SE2645 : Boggy valley, Castley by Humphrey Bolton

This is the view along the lane towards a sharp bend that could be called the centre of the village. At any rate the parish notice board is on the building at the bend.

SE2645 : The village centre, Castley by Humphrey Bolton

There is a road junction here, with Chapel Hill Lane going off to the south. This was diverted when the railway was built, doubling back to a bridge under the railway whereas it previously went straight to Chapel Hill. A footpath goes off to the north-east, and this might be the line of the road to Weeton shown on Jefferys's map. Here is Castley Bridge, along Chapel Hill Lane:

SE2645 : Bridge under the railway, Castley by Humphrey Bolton

Opposite it is Greengates Farm, which was not on the 1850 map.

SE2646 (Images)


1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright


Castley Lane runs along the southern edge of the western half of this square. At SE262461 (Images) there is a square boundary stone with a rounded top, inscribed '1767, K F'. This stone marks the boundary of Knaresborough Forest. The boundary is marked on the 1850 6 map with the comment 'Perambulated in 1767'.

SE2646 : Boundary stone, Castley Lane, Castley by Humphrey Bolton

SE263460 (Images) Castley Ford went across the bend in the river bend diagonally from the end of Badger Lane. There is no sign of a ford now:

SE2646 : The River Wharfe, Castley by Humphrey Bolton

Nearby a lane leads northwards to Ings Farm.

SE2646 : Access Lane to Ings Farm by Chris Heaton

This lane was called Badger Lane on the 1850 map, when the farm did not exist, but it does not go all the way to the main road. Now it is impassable to the north of Ings Farm, and the way has been diverted into a field on the eastern side of the former lane.

SE2646 : Stile near Ings Farm, Castley by Humphrey Bolton

However on Jefferys's map it is shown going up onto Castley Moor to join the old Harrogate road. Here is a view of Ings Farm from Castley Lane:

SE2646 : Ings Farm, Castley by Humphrey Bolton

From the village centre, Castley Lane continues up the eastern side of this square. On the eastern side there is a field barn next to White House farm:

SE2646 : Field barn off Castley Lane, Castley by Humphrey Bolton SE2646 : White House Farm, Castley by Humphrey Bolton

Castley Farm is at SE268464 (Images) . It is approached from the south by a little climb (first picture); the second picture shows the farmhouse, and the third is the view down Castley Lane from the north.

SE2646 : Castley Lane, Castley by Humphrey Bolton SE2646 : Farmhouse, Castley Farm, Castley by Humphrey Bolton SE2646 : Castley Farm by Roger Foyle

The parish boundary is a stream:

SE2646 : Stream bank, Castley lane, Castley by Humphrey Bolton

The A658 Harrogate Road passes through the north-west part of the square. It was constructed after 1775 (it is not shown on Jefferys's map) as a branch of the Dudley Hill Killinghall and Harrogate Trust. No doubt this was due to the growing importance of Harrogate as a spa town; it also provided an easier route from Pool Bridge to Killinghall. The main road of this trust was from Dudley Hill (Bradford) to Killinghall via Beckwithshaw, constructed c.1753.

At SE264467 (Images) there is a milestone of the standard West Riding County Council type, ie a cast-iron plate triangular in section with a rounded head, bolted to a stone. The inscriptions are: Head - 'Dudleyhill Killinghall and Harrogate Road'. Left face - 'Bradford 12 miles'. Right face - 'Harrogate 6 miles'. By Act of Parliament turnpike roads had to have milestones from 1767, but in Yorkshire most of these were replaced by the County Councils after they were formed in 1889.

SE2745 (Images)


1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright


From Castley Bridge, Chapel Hill Lane follows the southern side of the railway embankment:

SE2745 : Chapel Hill Farm by Roger Foyle

And then bends east-south-east. Here a railway maintenance track goes up the embankment. This was probably used for the recent repair work. A large amount of fill material was needed to stabilise the railway embankment, and this work was planned and carried out in conjunction with major renewal works in the nearby Bramhope Tunnel. This provided a large volume of redundant railway ballast, which was exported by rail to the Castley site and used as general fill on the embankment.

SE2745 : Railway maintenance track, Castley by Humphrey Bolton

There is also what looks like an old spoil heap, perhaps from the original construction of the railway:

SE2745 : Old spoil heap, Castley by Humphrey Bolton

At Chapel Hill, 'Site of Chapel' is marked on the 1850 map. This would be a 'chapel-of-ease' for the lord of the manor. Also on this map the lane continues to the Manor House, at the top of a steep slope, at SE271457 (Images) .

SE2746 (Images)


1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright


At SE271462 (Images) 'Site of Fort' is shown on the 1850 map, with the comment 'querns have been found here'.

A public footpath goes under the railway embankment via this rather elegant bridge:

SE2746 : Bridge near Chapel Hill Farm by Chris Heaton

Further Reading

H Speight, Upper Wharfedale, London, 1900;
B Jennings (ed), A History of Harrogate and Knaresborough, Huddersfield, 1970.
KML
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