Lomond Hills Regional Park

( Page 1 ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 )
Creative Commons License Text by Bill Kasman, May 2017 ; This work is dedicated to the Public Domain.
Images are under a separate Creative Commons Licence.


SECTION ONE

Glenvale


The road approach to this access point is shared with that to the Bunnet Stane. Several images are common to these two routes.

This is a popular route into the regional park as it leads directly to two interesting features of the park - Edge Head and the waterfall at the head of Glenvale which is a very pretty spot on a sunny day. The sandstone outcrop of Edge Head was once the location of several 'caves' - actually more like recesses in the rock - one of which was known as John Knox's Pulpit but, in 2004, the local authority was forced to remove these 'caves' due to safety concerns as the sandstone was beginning to crumble and deposit debris onto the footpath which ran immediately below. It is also possible to ascend Bishop Hill from Glenvale.

NO1604 : Turning into Dryside Road, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
On the A911 close to its junction with the B919 is the turning into Dryside Road which leads to the starting points for two routes into the Lomond Hills Regional Park - the path to Glenvale and the path to the Bunnet Stane and West Lomond. The road sign points to Glenlomond and Wester Balgedie.
Dryside Road runs from this position to the village of Strathmiglo and can also be accessed from there.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1604 : Wester Balgedie, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
Dryside Road NO1604 : Turning into Dryside Road, Lomond Hills passes through the small village of Wester Balgedie.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1604 : Dryside road, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
After leaving Wester Balgedie the road which leads to both the Glenvale path and the path to the Bunnet Stane and West Lomond NO1604 : Turning into Dryside Road, Lomond Hills continues. The hill in the distance is West Lomond.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1604 : Road sign on Dryside Road, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
This road sign reminds drivers that this road is well used by both walkers and cyclists.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1604 : Dryside road, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
Dryside Road NO1604 : Turning into Dryside Road, Lomond Hills continues straight ahead. From this point the road is a narrow single-track road with very few passing places. It is well used by walkers, cyclists and other traffic and drivers should exercise care. The turning to the right leads to the small village of Glenlomond.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1706 : Woodland on Dryside Road, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
Dryside Road approaches a belt of woodland. The start of the Glenvale path is just within these woods.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1805 : West Lomond and Bishop Hill by Bill Kasman
From the same position as this image NO1706 : Woodland on Dryside Road, Lomond Hills we see West Lomond (left) and Bishop Hill (right). The gap between the two is Glenvale.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1706 : Path to Glenvale, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
Just as Dryside Road enters woodland NO1706 : Woodland on Dryside Road, Lomond Hills we find the start of the path to Glenvale on the right. 200 metres further on there is a small car park.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1706 : Glenvale car park. Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
This small car park is about 200 metres away from the start of the Glenvale path NO1706 : Path to Glenvale, Lomond Hills. It is very popular and you have to be quick to get a space here especially at weekends! The hill is West Lomond.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1706 : Path to Glenvale, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
These gates are the beginning of the path from Dryside Road to Glenvale. See also this image NO1706 : Path to Glenvale, Lomond Hills.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1706 : Are these counters? by Bill Kasman
A few yards along the path to Glenvale NO1706 : Path to Glenvale, Lomond Hills are these two posts with some sort of 'window' in them. They face each other exactly across the path and may be some kind of counting device to record the number of people who use this path. There are similar devices elsewhere in the park.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1706 : Path to Glenvale, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
The path to Glenvale NO1706 : Path to Glenvale, Lomond Hills continues through the woods.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1706 : Path to Glenvale, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
About 250 metres from its start NO1706 : Path to Glenvale, Lomond Hills the path deteriorates slightly and the woods begin to thin out.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1706 : Footbridge on Glenvale path, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
After a few hundred metres the path to Glenvale NO1706 : Path to Glenvale, Lomond Hills crosses this bridge over the Glen Burn. Once over the bridge the path is obviously fairly new and in excellent condition which is a big change from what it used to be - a well-worn trench through the heather!
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1706 : Path to Glenvale, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
The excellent path to Glenvale is a pleasure to follow. West Lomond (left) and part of Bishop Hill are now visible. The gap between the two is Glenvale.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1806 : Path to Glenvale, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
The excellent path winds its way over the muir towards the hills and Glenvale.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1806 : Path to Glenvale, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
On this uphill section of the path the park authority have put in place measures to minimise erosion and help with the stability of the path.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1806 : Path to Glenvale, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
The path eventually reaches this gate. Beyond it sheep graze on the open hill so please make sure it is closed behind you.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1806 : Old path and new path near Edge Head, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
The path to Glenvale NO1706 : Path to Glenvale, Lomond Hills reaches this junction. The new path can be seen crossing the Glen Burn and heading further on. The faint path to the left is the original path which passes directly under the sandstone outcrop of Edge Head and is no longer recommended by the park authority because of the danger of falling rocks. However, it is still accessible and many people still use it.
Note: The sandstone outcrop of Edge Head is the location of John Knox's pulpit and that name is commonly applied to the whole of the outcrop.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1805 : Edge Head, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
The original path can be seen on the right of the image. See also this image NO1806 : Old path and new path near Edge Head, Lomond Hills. A faint path can be seen heading to the left. It climbs to the top of Edge Head and connects with a path which leads to the group of rocks known as the Devil's Burdens and eventually to West Lomond.
Note: The sandstone outcrop of Edge Head is the location of John Knox's pulpit and that name is commonly applied to the whole of the outcrop.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1805 : Edge Head, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
This faint path leaves the old path which runs below Edge Head and climbs past some crags to the top of Edge Head. It also joins onto a path which leads to the rocks known as the Devil's Burdens and on to West Lomond.
There is something interesting on the crags to the left NO1805 : Memorial near Edge Head, Lomond Hills.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1805 : Memorial near Edge Head, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
On this crag near Edge Head NO1805 : Edge Head, Lomond Hills I found this brightly-coloured display of flowers NO1805 : Memorial near Edge Head, Lomond Hills.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1805 : Memorial near Edge Head, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
A closer look at this bunch of flowers NO1805 : Memorial near Edge Head, Lomond Hills revealed that they were plastic. There are also three inscriptions carved into the rock beside them NO1805 : Shadow's Memorial, Lomond Hills.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1805 : Shadow's Memorial, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
Carved into the rock beside this bunch of flowers NO1805 : Memorial near Edge Head, Lomond Hills is the name 'Shadow' and the date 29.10.13. I assume that Shadow was someone's much-loved dog. There are two other inscriptions carved into the rock: 'Mum' and 'Dad' both with recent dates.
This poignant memorial seems to tell the tale of a family who enjoyed visiting these hills and whose memory will persist, for a while, at least, to be wondered at by those who stumble across it.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1805 : View from Shadow's Memorial, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
Looking back down Glenvale. An excellent location for a memorial NO1805 : Shadow's Memorial, Lomond Hills.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1805 : Edge Head, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
On top of Edge Head looking down. Two large blocks of stone are poised close to the edge. No wonder the park authority no longer recommend the old path which runs right below this location! See also this image NO1806 : Old path and new path near Edge Head, Lomond Hills.
Note: The sandstone outcrop of Edge Head is the location of John Knox's pulpit and that name is commonly applied to the whole of the outcrop.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1805 : Path at top of Edge Head, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
From the top of Edge Head this path runs through the heather to the rocks known as the Devil's Burdens and further on to West Lomond.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1805 : Below Edge Head, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
Looking up from directly beneath Edge Head the two loose rocks NO1805 : Edge Head, Lomond Hills can just be seen. Also visible is the flat area on the right front face of the outcrop from where the rockfall responsible for the park authority's decision to use explosives to bring down what was perceived as further dangerously loose rocks originated.
Note: The sandstone outcrop of Edge Head is the location of John Knox's pulpit and that name is commonly applied to the whole of the outcrop.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1805 : Path past Edge Head, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
The old path continues past Edge Head NO1806 : Old path and new path near Edge Head, Lomond Hills. The faint path to the right leads to the waterfall at the head of Glenvale.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1905 : Path to waterfall at head of Glenvale, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
This path can be treacherous at times. Parts of it slope downhill, the surface is a loose, sandy material and it gets quite slippery when wet. Care is needed.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1905 : Waterfall at head of Glenvale, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
In a narrow, rocky and quite claustrophobic 'mini canyon' the waterfall flows down a series of steps into a shallow pool. After heavy rain it gets quite spectacular (and noisy) and care must be taken to avoid a soaking! The burn is the Glen Burn. The old path past Edge Head runs through the heather above the crags on the left NO1905 : Old path past Edge Head, Lomond Hills and the new path runs above the crags on the right NO1905 : New path past Edge Head, Lomond Hills.
Note: The sandstone outcrop of Edge Head is the location of John Knox's pulpit and that name is commonly applied to the whole of the outcrop.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1905 : Eroded rocks in Glenvale, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
In the area of Edge Head and the upper reaches of Glenvale are quite a few eroded, water-worn, rocky crags, evidence of this area's geological past. This one is in the 'mini canyon' of the waterfall (just to the right of this image) at the head of Glenvale NO1905 : Waterfall at head of Glenvale, Lomond Hills.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1905 : Waterfall at head of Glenvale, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
As far as I am aware this waterfall doesn't have a name. I have always referred to it as the Glen Burn Waterfall, since the burn involved is the Glen Burn which flows down Glenvale, but when talking to others no-one seems to recognise it as such and I always have to explain exactly where it is!
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1805 : Edge Head, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
From the waterfall at the head of Glenvale NO1905 : Waterfall at head of Glenvale, Lomond Hills, Edge Head is the obvious feature near centre frame. The normal access path for this spot can be seen on the right of the image but for the adventurous there is a path which runs below the crags on the left and joins the new path on the opposite side of the glen from Edge Head NO1806 : Old path and new path near Edge Head, Lomond Hills. This path can be difficult to negotiate so care is needed else you will end up in the burn!
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1905 : The old path continues past Edge Head, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
The old path past Edge Head NO1806 : Old path and new path near Edge Head, Lomond Hills continues over these slabs and runs above the waterfall at the head of Glenvale NO1905 : Waterfall at head of Glenvale, Lomond Hills to join the path to Harperleas Reservoir.
Note: The sandstone outcrop of Edge Head is the location of John Knox's pulpit and that name is commonly applied to the whole of the outcrop.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1905 : Old path past Edge Head, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
This is the old path past Edge Head which is no longer recommended by the park authority due to the danger of falling rock NO1805 : Below Edge Head, Lomond Hills but it is still accessible and is still used by many walkers. This section winds its way through the heather above the waterfall at the head of Glenvale NO1905 : Waterfall at head of Glenvale, Lomond Hills to join the new path which eventually leads to Harperleas Reservoir.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1905 : Old path past Edge Head, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
As it progresses towards its meeting with the new path the old path past Edge Head NO1905 : Old path past Edge Head, Lomond Hills becomes faint and difficult to follow but just keep going in the same direction and you will come to the new path after 100 metres or so. This section can become very wet at times.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1905 : Old path past Edge Head, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
This is the junction of the old path past Edge Head NO1806 : Old path and new path near Edge Head, Lomond Hills with the new path. Neither the fence nor the warning sign does anything to keep walkers out and the old path is still quite well used.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1905 : Path to Bishop Hill, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
On the path from Glenvale to Harperleas Reservoir and from the same position as this image NO1905 : Path to Harperleas Reservoir, Lomond Hills this path leads to Bishop Hill.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1905 : Path to Harperleas Reservoir, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
This is the new path which leads from Glenvale to Harperleas Reservoir. The wooden fence which marks the spot where the old path past Edge Head joins it NO1905 : Old path past Edge Head, Lomond Hills can be seen just left of centre frame. From this position there is a path which heads to the right and ascends Bishop Hill NO1905 : Path to Bishop Hill, Lomond Hills.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1905 : New path past Edge Head, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
Taken from a position above the waterfall at the head of Glenvale NO1905 : Waterfall at head of Glenvale, Lomond Hills the new path can be seen winding its way over the muir towards Harperleas Reservoir.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1805 : New path past Edge Head, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
This is the path which the park authority now recommend instead of the old path which runs right under Edge Head (on the left of the image) NO1806 : Old path and new path near Edge Head, Lomond Hills. It is a much better path than the muddy track it used to be!
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1805 : Path to Bishop Hill, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
As the new path past Edge Head comes up the hill NO1806 : Old path and new path near Edge Head, Lomond Hills this path (on the left in this image but on the right as you come up the hill) doubles back. It is the beginning of a path which ascends Bishop Hill.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1805 : Path to Bishop Hill, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
The path which breaks off from the new path past Edge Head NO1805 : Path to Bishop Hill, Lomond Hills reaches the gate visible on the left to begin its ascent of Bishop Hill.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1805 : Path to Bishop Hill, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
In order to reach the path which ascends Bishop Hill NO1805 : Path to Bishop Hill, Lomond Hills it is necessary to climb this wire fence. The path is faint in its lower reaches but just follow the line of the fence until you reach the signpost on the horizon NO1805 : Signpost near Edge Head, Lomond Hills where the path turns left and becomes more well defined.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1805 : Signpost near Edge Head, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
The signpost visible in this image NO1805 : Path to Bishop Hill, Lomond Hills indicates a choice of three routes. Back down the hill to Glenvale; follow the path up the hill to Bishop Hill and Kinnesswood; or cross the fence and take a pleasant low-level path which leads to Glenlomond.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1805 : Path to Bishop Hill, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
From the signpost NO1805 : Signpost near Edge Head, Lomond Hills the path begins its climb to Bishop Hill some of the crags of which are visible.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1805 : Gate and direction post, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
Looking back down the hill towards the signpost NO1805 : Signpost near Edge Head, Lomond Hills. The path to Glenvale can be seen on the right.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1805 : Path to Glenlomond, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
From the gate and signpost NO1805 : Gate and direction post, Lomond Hills a faint path can be seen (right of centre) crossing a grassy field. It eventually finds its way to the village of Glenlomond. Although not a popular route is does form part of a circular walk beginning at the path to Bishop Hill on the A911 just up the road from Scotlandwell NO1801 : Path from Scotlandwell to Bishop Hill, along the top of the cliffs, past Carlin Maggie, down to the signpost and through this field to Glenlomond thence by Dryside Road back to the A911.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


KML

( Page 1 ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 )
You are not logged in login | register