Lomond Hills Regional Park

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Creative Commons License Text by Bill Kasman, May 2017 ; This work is dedicated to the Public Domain.
Images are under a separate Creative Commons Licence.


SECTION ONE

Bunnet Stane


The road approach to this access point is shared with that to Glenvale. Several images are common to these two routes.

This isn't a popular route for climbing any of the hills in the regional park but it is a very pleasant walk on a sunny day especially in springtime with lambs gambolling in the fields. It is a gentle gradient all the way from the very small parking area on Dryside Road to the Bunnet Stane at the foot of West Lomond. It is possible to climb West Lomond from the Bunnet Stane but the route is on steep grass which can be treacherous when wet so care is needed.

The Bunnet Stane is an oddly-shaped outcrop of rock which looks a bit like a mushroom. Part of the same outcrop is the Maiden Bower - a cave which legend says was the retreat of a maiden whose lover was slain.

NO1604 : Turning into Dryside Road, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
On the A911 close to its junction with the B919 is the turning into Dryside Road which leads to the starting points for two routes into the Lomond Hills Regional Park - the path to Glenvale and the path to the Bunnet Stane and West Lomond. The road sign points to Glenlomond and Wester Balgedie.
Dryside Road runs from this position to the village of Strathmiglo and can also be accessed from there.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1604 : Wester Balgedie, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
Dryside Road NO1604 : Turning into Dryside Road, Lomond Hills passes through the small village of Wester Balgedie.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1604 : Dryside road, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
After leaving Wester Balgedie the road which leads to both the Glenvale path and the path to the Bunnet Stane and West Lomond NO1604 : Turning into Dryside Road, Lomond Hills continues. The hill in the distance is West Lomond.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1604 : Road sign on Dryside Road, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
This road sign reminds drivers that this road is well used by both walkers and cyclists.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1604 : Dryside road, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
Dryside Road NO1604 : Turning into Dryside Road, Lomond Hills continues straight ahead. From this point the road is a narrow single-track road with very few passing places. It is well used by walkers, cyclists and other traffic and drivers should exercise care. The turning to the right leads to the small village of Glenlomond.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1706 : Woodland on Dryside Road, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
Dryside Road approaches a belt of woodland. The start of the Glenvale path is just within these woods.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1805 : West Lomond and Bishop Hill by Bill Kasman
From the same position as this image NO1706 : Woodland on Dryside Road, Lomond Hills we see West Lomond (left) and Bishop Hill (right). The gap between the two is Glenvale.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1808 : Bunnet Stane car park, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
A few hundred metres further on from the car park just past the start of the Glenvale path NO1706 : Glenvale car park. Lomond Hills is this very small parking area. The building belongs to Scottish Water and the path to the Bunnet Stane begins just this side of it.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1808 : Path to Bunnet Stane, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
The sign on the left asks people not to take dogs any further since there are lambs in the fields ahead. The hill is West Lomond.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1807 : Old cattle grid by Bill Kasman
Just after a double dogleg on the path to the Bunnet Stane NO1808 : Path to Bunnet Stane, Lomond Hills is this filled-in cattle grid. There are no gates between here and Dryside Road indicating that this field has had a change of use and is no longer used to graze sheep or cattle.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1807 : Path to Bunnet Stane, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
Beyond this gate the path continues through a field used to graze sheep.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1807 : Bunnet Stane, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
The isolated sandstone outcrop of the Bunnet Stane is a curiosity. It has a pillar of rock topped by a flat 'cap' or bunnet (bonnet in English!).
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1807 : Bunnet Stane, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
It is quite possible to jump from the flat outcrop onto the Bunnet Stane - the gap is only about five feet. I have seen it done but have never been brave enough to try it myself!
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1807 : Bunnet Stane, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
The sandstone outcrop of the Bunnet Stane has several cave-like recesses. The metal railings to the right of the image guard the Maiden Bower NO1807 : Maiden Bower, Lomond Hills.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1807 : Maiden Bower, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
This cave, cut into the rocky outcrop of the Bunnet Stane NO1807 : Bunnet Stane, Lomond Hills, has the legend attached to it that a heartbroken maiden lived the life of a hermit here after her true love was slain. A romantic idea but probably not true LinkExternal link. Once upon a time the floor of this cave was inches deep in sheep droppings but the park authority have cleaned the interior and erected metal railings to keep them out. There is an information board giving details of the likely origins of the cave and the legend of the Maiden but it is in poor condition and doesn't photograph well.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1807 : Maiden Bower, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
This is inside the Maiden Bower NO1807 : Maiden Bower, Lomond Hills. It's about 12 feet square and with a door fitted and a small fire going it would have been quite cosy.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1807 : Maiden Bower, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
A close view of one of the walls of the Maiden Bower NO1807 : Maiden Bower, Lomond Hills. Chisel marks can be clearly seen from when the cave was constructed (it may have been a natural cave which was extended). Various holes in the walls could have held brackets for shelves.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1807 : Bunnet Stane, Lomond Hills by Bill Kasman
The flat top of the outcrop adjacent to the Bunnet Stane NO1807 : Bunnet Stane, Lomond Hills carries quite a lot of graffiti carved into the rock.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


NO1906 : Path to West Lomond by Bill Kasman
Uphill of the Bunnet Stane NO1807 : Bunnet Stane, Lomond Hills is a path which climbs the escarpment and joins the main path from Craigmead car park to West Lomond. A walker can be seen beginning the ascent which follows the stone wall half way up the hill and then turns left and climbs diagonally up the steep grass slope.
See Lomond Hills Regional Park article Link
by Bill Kasman


KML

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