Royal Air Force Stations in Lincolnshire

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Creative Commons License Text by Adrian S Pye, August 2019 ; This work is dedicated to the Public Domain.
Images are under a separate Creative Commons Licence.


RAF Binbrook

Airfield Code: EGXB/GSY; Grid reference: iro TF 191 958

TF2094 : 460 Squadron RAAF memorial at Binbrook by Adrian S Pye TF1995 : Station memorial at RAF Binbrook by Adrian S Pye TF1995 : Detail of the Station memorial at RAF Binbrook by Adrian S Pye TF1995 : Station HQ ex RAF Binbrook by Adrian S Pye TF1995 : Former R.A.F. Binbrook by Chris TF1895 : Binbrook airfield by Chris TF1895 : Protective Wall by Mr T TF1895 : Hangar by Mr T TF1995 : C type aeroplane hangars at  ex RAF Binbrook by Adrian S Pye TF1995 : 460 Squadron (RAAF) Memorial Ident Square by Jonathan Thacker TF1995 : Binbrook Aerodrome by Dave Hitchborne TF1995 : Former R.A.F. Binbrook (Brookenby) by Chris TF1995 : Former R.A.F. Binbrook (Brookenby) by Chris TF1995 : Former R.A.F. Binbrook (Brookenby) by Chris TF1995 : XR724 F6 English Electric Lightning by Adrian S Pye


1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright
1:50,000 Modern Day Landranger(TM) Map © Crown Copyright


Ash Hill on the edge of the Lincolnshire Wolds was the chosen site for Binbrook. It was one of the last airfields built as part of the pre-war expansion scheme. Work began in spring 1938, before it was completed it had been allocated to No.1 Group Bomber Command. Five C-Type hangers were built to accommodate the aircraft.
Binbrook was opened as a Bomber Command station in June 1940, and was home to Nos. 12 and 142 Squadrons which operated Fairey Battles, a single-engine light bomber, between 3 July 1940 and 25 September 1942 before moving to RAF Wickenby.
Because the airfield didn't have hard runways there were problems with aircraft sinking into the mud and so in 1942 the airfield was closed and concrete runways and perimeter track were built.
460 Squadron Royal Australian Air Force, moved in in May 1943, bringing with them the Avro Lancaster. 460 Squadron remained the only operational unit at the airfield for the remainder of WW2.
460 Squadron were to take part in the final raid of WW2, when they took part in the daylight attack on Berchtesgaden, Hitlerís Bavarian headquarters.
The coming of the jet age saw the arrival of the English Electric Canberra, Gloster Javelin and the English Electric Lightning which became synonymous with Binbrook. But by 1973 the days of the Lightning were numbered with the introduction of the SEPECAT Jaguar into the Royal Air Force.
The first squadron to leave was 5 Squadron in December 1987 having been disbanded. They were joined shortly after by 11 Squadron in April 1988, and the last of the Lightnings had finally gone.
Although sold off, with much of the airfieldís building still standing, walking around the old station can still bring evoke emotional memories of itís history.
The sound of Lightning engines can still be heard today at the airfield. As the volunteers of the Lightning Association continue their hard work on XR724. LinkExternal link
The old married quarters site has been renamed to become the village of Brookenby.

KML

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