SK7761 : Church of St Laurence, Norwell

taken 5 years ago, near to Norwell, Nottinghamshire, Great Britain

Church of St Laurence, Norwell
Church of St Laurence, Norwell
View across the nave from the south transept. This shows the difference in detail between the two aisle arcades, the nearer being the earlier of the two.
Church of St Laurence, Norwell
The church certainly has Norman origins, main remaining feature from this period being the late 12th century south door. The aisle arcades are early 13th century, that of the south aisle being slightly earlier (c.1200) than the north (c1225-50). The lancet windows of the chancel are of this period also, and the chancel and tower arches are lat 13th century too. The south transept is originally 13th century, but much remodelled in the 15th, with windows in Perpendicular style. The north transept and south porch are 14th century and the fine clerestory with its distinctive Perpendicular windows with lozenge tracery dates from the second half of the 15th century. The lower stages of the tower are 13th century work, the upper stages from the 15th.

The interior of the church is spacious with a wide south aisle and north and south transepts. The impression in the nave is very much of an Early English church with well proportioned arcades to both aisles. These are well illuminated by the large clerestory windows, of later date. Some earlier corbels were retained when this was done and inserted between the arches of the south aisle. At the far end is the fine early 14th century 5 light east window in Decorated style.

Notable interior features are the original 15th century timber roof of the north transept, which includes a boss with a fine carving of a green man. In the south transept a late 13th tomb recess contains an effigy of a recumbent cross-legged knight. Details of the armour date this to between 1320 and 1330, suggesting that it may represent Sir John de Lysours, lord of Willoughby by Norwell, who was murdered in 1322. In the south aisle a similar recess contains the effigy of a lady with a wimple. There is speculation that she was originally matched with the male effigy, but there is no evidence to substantiate this. Both effigies are later than the tomb recesses, and are thought to have been moved to their present locations during the restoration of 1874-5.

All the figurative glass in the church is of 19th and 20th origin, although several of the windows have pre-restoration plain glass.

Adjacent to the south transept tomb recess is an elaborately decorated 14th century piscina and aumbry. This has a remarkable face in the upper right spandrel, basically human but with animal ears, and what is either a beard or representation of wind blowing from the mouth. The square surround moulding is also stopped with a pair of laughing heads. There is a less elaborate piscina in the north transept, but this too has grotesque hood stops. From the north transept a narrow winding stair rises to the level of the long demolished rood loft.

The church is Listed Grade I. For fuller information see LinkExternal link

The churchyard contains a few late 17th gravestones and there is a finely engraved sundial dated 1665 on a pedestal dated 1736 with the names of the churchwardens of the time, Richard Wright and Richard Burkitt. There is an older, incomplete, scratch sundial on the south west corner of the south transept. Parts of a grave marker of around 1200 can be seen on either side of the archway into the south porch. To the south east of the church a modern grass labyrinth has been created. The churchyard wall dates from the 19th century and is Listed Grade II for group value.
Listed Buildings and Structures
Listed buildings and structures are officially designated as being of special architectural, historical or cultural significance. There are over half a million listed structures in the United Kingdom, covered by around 375,000 listings.
Listed status is more commonly associated with buildings or groups of buildings, however it can cover many other structures, including bridges, headstones, steps, ponds, monuments, walls, phone boxes, wrecks, parks, and heritage sites, and in more recent times a road crossing (Abbey Road) and graffiti art (Banksy 'Spy-booth') have been included.

In England and Wales there are three main listing designations;
Grade I (2.5%) - exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important.
Grade II* (5.5%) - particularly important buildings of more than special interest.
Grade II (92%) - nationally important and of special interest.

There are also locally listed structures (at the discretion of local authorities) using A, B and C designations.

In Scotland three classifications are also used but the criteria are different. There are around 47,500 Listed buildings.
Category A (8%)- generally equivalent to Grade I and II* in England and Wales
Category B (51%)- this appears generally to cover the ground of Grade II, recognising national importance.
Category C (41%)- buildings of local importance, probably with some overlap with English Grade II.

In Northern Ireland the criteria are similar to Scotland, but the classifications are:
Grade A (2.3%)
Grade B+ (4.7%)
Grade B (93%)

…read more at wikipedia LinkExternal link
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SK7761, 90 images   (more nearby )
Photographer
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Date Taken
Thursday, 24 July, 2014   (more nearby)
Submitted
Wednesday, 30 July, 2014
Geographical Context
Historic sites and artefacts  Village, Rural settlement  Religious sites 
Period (from Tags)
13th Century 
Primary Subject of Photo
Church Interior 
Subject Location
OSGB36: geotagged! SK 7755 6176 [10m precision]
WGS84: 53:8.8408N 0:50.5174W
Camera Location
OSGB36: geotagged! SK 7756 6175
View Direction
North-northwest (about 337 degrees)
Looking for a postcode? Try this pageExternal link
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Other Tags
Grade I Listed  Church Nave  Early English Style  Aisle Arcade 

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