SK2570 : Queen Mary's Bower at Chatsworth Horse Trials

taken 2 years ago, near to Edensor, Derbyshire, Great Britain

Queen Mary's Bower at Chatsworth Horse Trials
Queen Mary's Bower at Chatsworth Horse Trials
Competitors in the CIC*** jump the log into the water then the skinny triple brush in the water before jumping out on the far side.

Queen Mary's Bower itself is a 16th century raised garden with a moat and is Grade II* listed, see LinkExternal link
Listed Buildings and Structures
Listed buildings and structures are officially designated as being of special architectural, historical or cultural significance. There are over half a million listed structures in the United Kingdom, covered by around 375,000 listings.
Listed status is more commonly associated with buildings or groups of buildings, however it can cover many other structures, including bridges, headstones, steps, ponds, monuments, walls, phone boxes, wrecks, parks, and heritage sites, and in more recent times a road crossing (Abbey Road) and graffiti art (Banksy 'Spy-booth') have been included.

In England and Wales there are three main listing designations;
Grade I (2.5%) - exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important.
Grade II* (5.5%) - particularly important buildings of more than special interest.
Grade II (92%) - nationally important and of special interest.

There are also locally listed structures (at the discretion of local authorities) using A, B and C designations.

In Scotland three classifications are also used but the criteria are different. There are around 47,500 Listed buildings.
Category A (8%)- generally equivalent to Grade I and II* in England and Wales
Category B (51%)- this appears generally to cover the ground of Grade II, recognising national importance.
Category C (41%)- buildings of local importance, probably with some overlap with English Grade II.

In Northern Ireland the criteria are similar to Scotland, but the classifications are:
Grade A (2.3%)
Grade B+ (4.7%)
Grade B (93%)

…read more at wikipedia LinkExternal link
Horse jumps: Water
Water obstacles on a cross-country course vary from simple to complex. There may be a drop fence into the water and/or out, or a gradual slope in or out. Many horses are cautious or fearful of water, and must be introduced to it carefully and repeatedly in cross-country schooling. In traversing the water, the effect of drag on the horse is considerable and must be taken into consideration.
Horse jumps: Log
Log fences are solid obstacles and require confidence in both horse and rider. Course designers usually make them big so the horses will respect them and are more likely to jump cleanly and boldly. Together with water jumps and sunken roads, they can be regarded as a stylised representation of obstacles likely to be encountered while out hunting.
Horse Trials
The equestrian sport of Eventing comprises three phases: dressage, showjumping and cross-country, which test horse and rider skills and abilities in different ways. (Both dressage and showjumping exist as competitive disciplines in their own right, but only eventing combines them and cross-country in a single competition). Competitions are called 'horse trials' and take place over one or more days, hence 'one-day event' (ODE), 'three-day event'.

There will usually be several classes at an event, each graded according to difficulty, complexity and/or duration, and run under either national rules (the UK governing body is British Eventing) or international rules (the FEI, or International Equestrian Federation). In the UK there are six levels of affiliated eventing to cater for all levels of horse and rider: BE80(T) (the 'T' stands for Training), BE90 (formerly 'Intro'), BE100 (formerly 'Pre-Novice'), Novice, Intermediate and Advanced. International classes are graded with a star system from * to ****. A four-star competition is the highest level of eventing. There are only six such competitions in the world, two of which are held in the UK: Badminton in the spring and Burghley in the autumn.

Scoring is on a cumulative penalty basis. In dressage, each movement is scored out of ten, with the total being added up and converted to a penalty. In showjumping, penalties are awarded for fences knocked down and also for exceeding the time limit. In the cross-country phase, penalties are awarded for a variety of infractions such as refusals, falls, circling between lettered obstacles, and exceeding the optimum time. The competitor with the fewest penalties at the end is the winner of the section.

For more information see:
British Eventing website LinkExternal link
Eventing entry in Wikipedia LinkExternal link
Chatsworth Park
Chatsworth's park covers about 1,000 acres and is open to the public free of charge all year-round, except for the south-east section, known as the Old Park, which is not open since it is used for breeding by the herds of red and fallow deer. It is centred around the stately home of Chatsworth House.
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SK2570, 223 images   (more nearby )
Photographer
  (find more nearby)
Date Taken
Saturday, 13 May, 2017   (more nearby)
Submitted
Thursday, 25 May, 2017
Geographical Context
Historic sites and artefacts  Sport, Leisure  Grassland  Lakes, Wetland, Bog  Country estates  People, Events 
Primary Subject of Photo
Horse Jump 
Subject Location
OSGB36: geotagged! SK 2573 7031 [10m precision]
WGS84: 53:13.7527N 1:36.9616W
Camera Location
OSGB36: geotagged! SK 2573 7034
View Direction
SOUTH (about 180 degrees)
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