Church of St Luke, Broughton Sulney (Upper Broughton) :: Shared Description

The ecclesiastical parish still retains the old name Broughton Sulney, although it is now part of a combined benefice with Hickling and Kinoulton.

The church consists of nave, north aisle, chancel, south porch and west tower. There is a low clerestory on the north side above the aisle.

The oldest structural fabric is in the south wall and consists of the remains of a late 12th century aisle arch, indicating the presence of an original south aisle. Analysis of the nave stonework suggests that the south aisle was removed to provide material for the late 15th century rebuilding when the nave was heightened and the clerestory added. The north aisle arcade is of mid-13th century Early English style.

The two tall 14th century windows in the south wall are not original, and appear to have been reclaimed from elsewhere during the 1879 restoration. A photo of the church from just before the restoration shows Georgian style windows, the church having been substantially remodelled around 1733. The porch is now the only surviving element of this restoration.

The lower stages of the tower include traces of Romanesque work, the upper stage frieze is however in late 13th century style.

Possibly the most intriguing feature is the carved block built into the east wall of the porch. This is thought to be early Norman work. Although described by Pevsner as a tympanum, more recent analysis suggests that it may have been part of an internal feature, possibly a shrine or calvary. The diamonds are interpreted as representing stars in the heavens and the figure, which is crowned, as St Oswald, to whom the church was originally dedicated.

The chancel was completely rebuilt by the then rector to a design by S.S. Teulon. An illustration in the church guide book shows how the church was intended to look, with a matching high-pitched nave roof, remodelled south wall with the porch in the western bay and a short pyramidal spire added to the tower. However, the responsibility for the nave lay with the parishioners who appear not to have been impressed, and when the church was finally restored in 1879, much more of the medieval fabric was retained. At this time the north aisle was completely rebuilt, 4 feet wider than before.

Apart from the architectural features noted, there are few items of interest inside the church. There is an attractive 14th century octagonal font with traceried panels in the north aisle; a charity board dated 1846 on the west wall of the nave; and a large patchwork quilt haningat the west end of the nave. This was created in 1981 recording events of that year. Not originally intended for display in the church, this was the only place with sufficient room to show it in its entirety.

Much of this information is taken from the excellent history pamphlet compiled by R C Jones, to whom I am indebted.

The church is Listed Grade I.

The churchyard contains a fine collection of early 18th century slate gravestones, including one of the larger sets of Belvoir Angels, numbering 25. Three groups of stones, to the south and west of the church, are Listed Grade II, comprising a total of 65 stones.
by Alan Murray-Rust
More nearby... Related descriptions Selection is automatic and approximate, it might not always select closely matching descriptions

9 images use this description:

SK6826 : Church of St Luke, Broughton Sulney (Upper Broughton) by Alan Murray-Rust
SK6826 : Church of St Luke, Upper Broughton by Alan Murray-Rust
SK6826 : Church of St Luke, Broughton Sulney (Upper Broughton) by Alan Murray-Rust
SK6826 : Church of St Luke, Broughton Sulney (Upper Broughton) by Alan Murray-Rust
SK6826 : Church of St Luke, Broughton Sulney (Upper Broughton) by Alan Murray-Rust
SK6826 : Church of St Luke, Upper Broughton by Alan Murray-Rust
SK6826 : Church of St Luke, Broughton Sulney (Upper Broughton) by Alan Murray-Rust
SK6826 : Church of St Luke, Broughton Sulney (Upper Broughton) by Alan Murray-Rust
SK6826 : Church of St Luke, Broughton Sulney (Upper Broughton) by Alan Murray-Rust


These Shared Descriptions are common to multiple images. For example, you can create a generic description for an object shown in a photo, and reuse the description on all photos of the object. All descriptions are public and shared between contributors, i.e. you can reuse a description created by others, just as they can use yours.
Created: Thu, 16 Apr 2015, Updated: Thu, 16 Apr 2015

The 'Shared Description' text on this page is Copyright 2015 Alan Murray-Rust, however it is specifically licensed so that contributors can reuse it on their own images without restriction.

You are not logged in login | register