Church of St Peter, Newton-on-Trent :: Shared Description

The church is of Norman origin but has undergone considerable changes to its layout over the years.

It appears to have begun as a Saxon church but was rebuilt, probably in the early 12th century as a traditional Norman church with a narrow nave and chancel with west tower. A north aisle was added during the Early English period when the church was given by the Bishop of Lincoln to the Gilbertine Priory of St Katherine without Lincoln. The influence of this connection can be seen in the quality of the aisle arcade capitals, two of which can be matched to a mason working on Lincoln Cathedral. The piers are quatrefoiled with keeled foils and slender round shafts in the diagonals. The west doorway dates from the same period.

The upper storey of the tower was added around 1600, although the battlements did not appear until 1875.

The first 19th century 'restoration' in 1818 was the work of Cayley Illingworth, Archdeacon of Stow, who apparently had a reputation as a “pompous and ignorant wrecker of churches”. It resulted in the removal of the aisle, the arcade being blocked up, the replacement of Decorated period windows in the south wall with the plain windows that exist today. A fine set of 15th century pews was destroyed at the same time; the remaining fragments still on show today survived only because were used as packing in the repairs to the roof. Box pews, a balcony and a triple-decker pulpit were installed at this stage reflecting the current liturgical practices. The chancel was largely rebuilt with a new chancel arch and the porch on the south side removed.

A second restoration in 1878 saw the early 19th century fittings removed, and replaced by standard Victorian pine pews and a new pulpit. The north aisle was rebuilt on the existing medieval foundations and the arcade opened up again. The vestry, built in 1863, was moved to its present position on the north side of the chancel at this time.

A finely traceried oak screen was inserted in the tower arch in 1937 in memory of George Clark.

The most recent changes, in the early part of the 21st century saw the church modified for use as a general purpose hall for the village. The Victorian pews in the nave were replaced by movable chairs, and kitchen, toilet and meeting room created within the north aisle. The chancel retains its liturgical layout with choir stalls and sanctuary.

The tower houses three late-17th century bells but for structural considerations were re-hung for chime ringing only in 1961.

The plain Norman font is located in the lobby under the tower.

The church is Listed Grade II*.

Information largely derived from the guide leaflet posted inside the church.
by Alan Murray-Rust
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11 images use this description:

SK8374 : Church of St Peter, Newton-on-Trent by Alan Murray-Rust
SK8374 : Church of St Peter, Newton-on-Trent by Alan Murray-Rust
SK8374 : Church of St Peter, Newton-on-Trent by Alan Murray-Rust
SK8374 : Church of St Peter, Newton-on-Trent by Alan Murray-Rust
SK8374 : Church of St Peter, Newton-on-Trent by Alan Murray-Rust
SK8374 : Church of St Peter, Newton-on-Trent by Alan Murray-Rust
SK8374 : Church of St Peter, Newton-on-Trent by Alan Murray-Rust
SK8374 : St Peter's Church High Street Newton on Trent by Jo Turner
SK8374 : Church of St Peter, Newton-on-Trent by Alan Murray-Rust
SK8374 : Church of St Peter, Newton-on-Trent by Alan Murray-Rust
SK8374 : Church of St Peter, Newton-on-Trent by Alan Murray-Rust


These Shared Descriptions are common to multiple images. For example, you can create a generic description for an object shown in a photo, and reuse the description on all photos of the object. All descriptions are public and shared between contributors, i.e. you can reuse a description created by others, just as they can use yours.
Created: Tue, 3 Oct 2017, Updated: Tue, 3 Oct 2017

The 'Shared Description' text on this page is Copyright 2017 Alan Murray-Rust, however it is specifically licensed so that contributors can reuse it on their own images without restriction.

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