Dippy the Diplodocus in Glasgow :: Shared Description

Dippy is one of ten plaster cast copies of the original diplodocus skeleton which was excavated during railway construction works in Wyoming, USA in 1899. Housed in London's Natural History Museum from 1905 until 1917, it is currently in Kelvingrove Museum & Art Gallery on the Glasgow leg of a UK road trip. It will stay here until 6th May when it will move to the next leg of the tour in Newcastle.

The skeleton consists of 292 bones, is 21.3 metres long, 4 metres wide and over 4 metres high.

Dippy was commissioned by Scots-born industrialist Andrew Carnegie, who owned the original fossilised skeleton, and had copies made from plaster.

See Dippy in London in 2016 TQ2679 : Inside the Natural History Museum, London.
by Thomas Nugent
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11 images use this description:

NS5666 : Diplodocus carnegii in Glasgow by M J Richardson
NS5666 : Dippy at Kelvingrove by Richard Sutcliffe
NS5666 : Diplodocus carnegii in Glasgow by M J Richardson
NS5666 : Dippy the Diplodocus by Thomas Nugent
NS5666 : The head of Dippy by M J Richardson
NS5666 : 'Fiona the Fungus' at Kelvingrove by M J Richardson
NS5666 : RSPB Scotland - Let's give wildlife a home by M J Richardson
NS5666 : Dippy the Diplodocus at Kelvingrove Museum and Art Gallery by Alison Nugent
NS5666 : Dippy in Kelvingrove by DS Pugh
NS5666 : Dippy the Diplodocus by Thomas Nugent
NS5666 : Dippy on Tour banners by Thomas Nugent


These Shared Descriptions are common to multiple images. For example, you can create a generic description for an object shown in a photo, and reuse the description on all photos of the object. All descriptions are public and shared between contributors, i.e. you can reuse a description created by others, just as they can use yours.
Created: Mon, 11 Feb 2019, Updated: Mon, 11 Feb 2019

The 'Shared Description' text on this page is Copyright 2019 Thomas Nugent, however it is specifically licensed so that contributors can reuse it on their own images without restriction.

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