Caithness Flagstone :: Shared Description

As seen in the centre of Glasgow the Caithness Flagstone is an attractive dark grey paving stone smooth, slightly uneven, reportedly hard-wearing and non-slip. The surface can be seen close up in Link It is sometimes referred to as Caithness Slate. In its area of origin, the far northeast of Scotland, a whole range of colours and thicknesses were traditionally used for building, roofing and fencing as well as paving. Occurring in thin, easily-separated layers a major industry developed in the nineteenth century to exploit and export it. Production declined from the early twentieth century with the advent of concrete paving and quarries closed. Since 1949 however, with the opening of the Spittal quarry, the industry has revived though on a smaller scale. Internet searches readily find the producers and suppliers of stone both for the public realm and domestic use. It is a distinctive element in the palette of materials and street furniture being used by Glasgow City Council in its long-term programme of improvements to major streets and public spaces: LinkExternal link

Claimed to be geologically unique, the Caithness Flagstone group of rocks, which extend into Orkney and Shetland, are siltstones and mudstones formed around 370 million years ago in the Devonian era from sediments deposited in the bed of a vast lake, Lake Orcadie. The flagstones belong to the Old Red Sandstone supergroup. The full thickness of the Caithness strata has been estimated as 4,500 metres.
by Robin Stott
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16 images use this description:

NS5965 : North on Montrose Street, Glasgow by Robin Stott
NS5965 : Surface water drainage in Exchange Place, Glasgow by Robin Stott
NS5965 : Paving, St Vincent Place, Glasgow by Robin Stott
NS5865 : Multi-coloured granite paviors, Gordon Street, Glasgow by Robin Stott
NS5965 : Exchange Place, Glasgow by Robin Stott
NS5965 : Two Buchanan Street landmarks, Glasgow by Robin Stott
NS5965 : Gates to the Ramshorn Graveyard, Ingram Street, Glasgow by Robin Stott
NS5965 : Open and closed public toilets, St Vincent Place, Glasgow by Robin Stott
NS5965 : Northwest corner of Royal Exchange Square, Glasgow by Robin Stott
NS5865 : North on West Nile Street, Glasgow by Robin Stott
NS5865 : West on St Vincent Street, Glasgow by Robin Stott
NS5965 : Paving, corner of Gordon Street and Buchanan Street, Glasgow by Robin Stott
NS5965 : Southwest corner of Royal Exchange Square, Glasgow by Robin Stott
NS5965 : Sightseers by a sightseeing bus, Queen Street, Glasgow by Robin Stott
NS5965 : Former Chief Office of the Royal Bank of Scotland, Royal Exchange Square, Glasgow by Robin Stott
NS5865 : Caithness Flagstone paving, Gordon Street, Glasgow by Robin Stott


These Shared Descriptions are common to multiple images. For example, you can create a generic description for an object shown in a photo, and reuse the description on all photos of the object. All descriptions are public and shared between contributors, i.e. you can reuse a description created by others, just as they can use yours.
Created: Mon, 8 Jul 2019, Updated: Mon, 8 Jul 2019

The 'Shared Description' text on this page is Copyright 2019 Robin Stott, however it is specifically licensed so that contributors can reuse it on their own images without restriction.

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