Salisbury Crags :: Shared Description

Although the Salisbury Crags form a familiar and prominent part of the view of Arthur's Seat, they are not, geologically speaking, related to the rest of Arthur's Seat at all!

They are the remnants of a sill of analcime-dolerite, formerly termed teschenite, which was intruded deep underground into the sandstones which underlie the Arthur's Seat volcano, long after the volcano had become extinct. Later again, earth movements tilted the whole structure so that the sill, like the lava flows that make up the volcano, now dips at 25º towards the east. The exposed scarp is up to 46 metres high, but it was quarried from about 200 years ago, and in places the present line of the scarp is well back from its original line.

The slope below is talus or scree, that is, loose pieces of rock which have fallen from the rock face and rolled downhill.

The crags, and especially the faces in the quarried parts, have been popular for climbing, but climbing is now controlled by the ranger service, and mostly takes place in the form of bouldering, resulting in trails of white chalk dust across the quarry faces.

The broad path round the foot of the crags is called the Radical Road. It is said to have been so named because it was paved by unemployed weavers after the 'Radical War' of 1820, a spell of strikes and unrest among artisans and skilled craftsmen seeking improved working conditions.

There is some doubt about the origin of the name Salisbury Crags. It has been suggested that they were named after the Earl of Salisbury, who accompanied King Edward III of England on an expedition to Scotland, but a more likely explanation is Lord Hailes' suggestion that is it from Anglo-Saxon and means a waste or dry settlement.

by N Chadwick
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46 images use this description. Preview sample shown below:

NT2673 : Edinburgh view from Salisbury Crags by Paul Gillett
NT2673 : Salisbury Crags by N Chadwick
NT2673 : Canongate Kirk and Salisbury Crags by Anne Burgess
NT2772 : Hutton's Section by Anne Burgess
NT2673 : Salisbury Crags by Paul Gillett
NT2673 : Flowers in Holyrood Park by Paul Gillett
NT2573 : View from the Scott Monument by N Chadwick
NT2772 : Arthur's Seat from Salisbury Crags by Anne Burgess
NT2673 : Viewcraig Street, Edinburgh by Malc McDonald
NT2573 : View from The Scott Monument -  towards Salisbury Crags and Arthurs Seat by N Chadwick
NT2672 : Photographing Hutton's Rock, Salisbury Craigs, Holyrood Park by Robin Stott
NT2673 : The Radical Road below Salisbury Crags by N Chadwick
NT2772 : Disused quarry, Salisbury Crags by N Chadwick
NT2674 : Bus stop, Regents Rd by N Chadwick
NT2772 : Salisbury Crags by Anne Burgess
NT2573 : View from The Scott Monument - North bridge and Waverley Station by N Chadwick
NT2673 : Our Dynamic Earth building and Salisbury Crags by Patrick Mackie
NT2673 : Salisbury Crags by N Chadwick
NT2772 : Radical Road below Salisbury Crags by N Chadwick
NT2772 : Hutton's Rock by Anne Burgess
NT2673 : Dynamic Earth buildings by Patrick Mackie
NT2673 : Salisbury Crags and Arthur's Seat by N Chadwick
NT2672 : Salisbury Crags by N Chadwick
NT2772 : Queen's Drive and Salisbury Crags by N Chadwick
NT2672 : Salisbury Crags by N Chadwick

... and 21 more images.

These Shared Descriptions are common to multiple images. For example, you can create a generic description for an object shown in a photo, and reuse the description on all photos of the object. All descriptions are public and shared between contributors, i.e. you can reuse a description created by others, just as they can use yours.
Created: Tue, 5 Apr 2011, Updated: Wed, 12 Jun 2013

The 'Shared Description' text on this page is Copyright 2011 N Chadwick, however it is specifically licensed so that contributors can reuse it on their own images without restriction.

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